Difference Between IRR and MIRR

Main Difference

The main difference between IRR and MIRR is that IRR (The internal rate of return) is an interest rate whenever NPV is equal to zero and MIRR (Modified internal rate of return) is the rate of return whenever NPV of terminal inflows is equal to the outflow.

IRR vs. MIRR

The internal rate of return (IRR) metrics is common among business managers; it inclines to overstate the profitability of a project and can head to capital budgeting mistakes based on an overly optimistic estimate. The modified internal rate of return (MIRR) recompense for this flaw and gives managers more control over the supposed reinvestment rate from future cash flow. When a project has different durations of positive and negative cash flows. In these cases, the IRR generates more than one number, causing uncertainty and confusion. MIRR solves this issue or problem as well. The IRR is more of an optimistic view of returns, while the MIRR is a realistic view.

Comparison Chart

IRRMIRR
IRR is a procedure of computing the rate of return taking into account internal factors, i.e., excepting the cost of capital and inflation.MIRR is a capital budgeting procedure that calculates the rate of return using the cost of capital and is used to rank several investments of equal size.
What about
It is the value at which NPV is equal to zero.It is the value at which NPV of terminal inflows is equal to the outflow, i.e., investment.
Accuracy
LowComparatively high
Assumption
Project cash flows reinvested at the project’s IRR.Project cash flows reinvested at the cost of capital.

What is the IRR?

Internal Rate of Return (IRR) is an economic resource for cash flow analysis, popular for assessing the performance of investments, capital attainment, project proposals, programs, and business case sceneries. IRR analysis begins with a revenue or cash flow stream, a series of net cash flow results expected from the capital (or action, acquisition, or business case scenario). Most people in business have at the least heard of “internal rate of return.” The name is common because financial officers often need an IRR estimate to support budget requests or action proposals. IRR is a favorite metrics of many CFOs, Controllers, and other financial specialists. Also, some businessmen know of IRR because many organizations define an obstacle rate as an IRR. They define, that is, an IRR rate that ingoing proposals must reach or overcome to qualify for approval and funding.

Reasons for IRR’s Popularity

  • Firstly, many in the financial group see IRR as more “objective” than the net present value (NPV). They have this view because NPV results from randomly chosen discount rates while IRR, by contrast, results completely from the cash flow figures themselves and their timing.
  • Secondly, some also judge that IRR readily compares return rates with inflation, current interest rates, and financial investment alternates. Note especially in the discussions below that this belief is sometimes supportable and sometimes not.

What is the MIRR?

MIRR (Modified internal rate of return) intends that positive cash flows reintegration at the firm’s cost of capital and that the opening expenses financed at the firm’s financing cost. The MIRR, therefore, more exactly deems the cost and profitability of a project. The MIRR is used to grade investments or projects of unequal size. With the MIRR, only a single solution occurs for a given project, and the reinvesting rate of positive cash flows is much more legitimate in practice. The MIRR enables project managers to change the supposed rate of reinvested growth from phase to phase in a project. The most usual method is to input the ordinary estimated cost of capital, but there is resilience to add any specific anticipated reinvestment rate. MIRR improves on IRR by the assumption that positive cash flows reinvested at the firm’s cost of capital. MIRR tends to rank investments or projects a firm or inventors may undertake. MIRR is designed to produce one solution, eliminating the issue of multiple IRRs.

Advantages

  • MIRR overcomes two major drawbacks of IRR containing the elimination of multiple IRRs in case of investments with uncommon timing of cash flows and secondly the re-investment problem discussed earlier.
  • Helps in the measurement of the sensitivity of investment towards variation in the cost of capital.

Key Differences

  1. Internal Rate of Return or IRR asserts a method of reckoning the discount rate considering internal factors, i.e., except the cost of capital and inflation. On the other hand, MIRR refers to the method of capital budgeting, which calculates the rate of return taking into account the cost of capital. It is used to rank several investments of the same size.
  2. IRR based on the principle that interim cash flows reinvested at the project’s IRR. Unlike, under MIRR, cash flows in addition to initial cash flows reinvested at the firm’s interest rate.
  3. The internal rate of return turns into a rate of yield or rate of return upon which NPV is equal to zero. Conversely, MIRR is the rate of return upon which NPV of terminal inflows is equal to the outflow, i.e., investment.
  4. The conviction of MIRR is more than IRR, as MIRR estimates the true rate of return.

Conclusion

The conclusion measure of both the operating budgeting methods is the same, but MIRR describes better profit in respect of the IRR, because of two main reasons, i.e., firstly, reinvesting of the cash flows at the expense of capital is actually possible, and secondly, numerous rates of return don’t subsist in the case of MIRR.