Difference Between Male Bearded Dragon vs. Female Bearded Dragon

Main Difference

The main difference between a male bearded dragon and the female bearded dragon is that male bearded dragon has two bumps on the underside of the tail and female bearded dragon has one bump at the middle.

Male Bearded Dragon vs. Female Bearded Dragon

Males are more likely to show their bearded. Females are more likely to wave their arms. Male dragons showed beard (spikes) as a form of courtship. Female dragons showed beard as a form of self-defense. Male dragons have darker beards and enlarged femoral pores. Female dragons have a light beard and also have femoral pores. Head of a female bearded dragon is larger and wider. Head of a female bearded dragon is smaller as compared to male. Both males and females dragons are habitual for digging, male digs holes for hibernation process and females are likely to dig holes for laying eggs. Male dragons show more aggressiveness during the breeding season and hence to be removed from the territory. Female dragons are less aggressive. Male bearded dragon has two hemipenal bulges, and the female bearded dragon has one hemipenal bulge. The tail of the male bearded dragon is large and thick having femoral pores, pores that are used to eject pheromones. The tail of the female bearded dragon is comparatively small and slender; the female dragon tail also has femoral pores. Male bearded dragons are larger. Female bearded dragons are smaller in size. Two male bearded dragons never keep on the same place together. It is possible to keep two female bearded dragons in the same place. Male bearded dragon can’t reproduce without mating. Female bearded can lay eggs and make them fertile without mating. The mouth of a male bearded dragon is wider. Female bearded dragon has a less wide mouth.

Comparison Chart

Male Bearded DragonFemale Bearded Dragon
Two bumpsOne bump
Head
Large and wideSmaller
Territory
TerritorialNon-territorial
Dig Holes
For hibernationFor laying eggs
Tail
ThickerSmaller slender

What is Male Bearded Dragon?

Male bearded dragon has prominent characteristics and traits that appear only over time. When a bearded dragon born, it doesn’t display prominent male features. These features only determine when the male bearded dragon becomes proper mature. Physically male bearded dragon has a bigger, wider tail having notable two bumps on each side. Male bearded dragons are territorial. To protect their territory, they display their beard, bob their throats and aggression towards a threat that they perceived, to show superiority and more powerful. The bearded dragon isn’t lonely and loves to be the center of attention. Frequently male bearded dragon reveals their beard for two main reasons, as a form of courtship and for defense mechanism. Male bearded dragons are aggressive; however, they are generally kept together. But during the breeding season, the male bearded dragons become too aggressive and have to be removed. Male bearded dragons have powerful territorial strips. Although like lizards bearded dragon as well are not naturally the most affectionate animals but create little affection to those people who are around them every day. It is unheard for the bearded dragons that they behave sweetly or affectionately with their closest people. They are just like lizards, but they have femoral pores located the underside of the hind legs. These pores are mostly more prominent in males. To appear more threaten bearded dragon may also gape or open his or her mouth very wide. Due to this behavior male dragon looks more aggressive since his mouth is quite large. However, dragons show dominance by bob their head.

What is Female Bearded Dragon?

Female bearded dragon has a slimmer tail which has a noticeable bump at the center of the portion. Female bearded dragons are different due to their spikes or beard. Female bearded dragons show off their beard or spikes when they are mating and when they are warding off potential predators. Female bearded dragons are less aggressive as compared to male bearded dragons. Typically they wave their hands to show their superiority within their vicinity. Female bearded dragons also have femoral pores that are commonly known as preanal pores. These pores secrete pheromones, especially during the mating season and are located on the underside of the hind legs running from knee to knees. Though narrating, if you’re not sure about hemipenal bulge, then you can use a flashlight to see it properly. Probing your bearded dragon is not the accurate way of checking the sex of the bearded dragon. Probing of any lizards and the bearded dragon can cause serious damage risks. Probing means vent forcefully or pull out the organ and put back in and close the vent without causing any damage. The only veterinarian that has a long and experienced history of treating reptiles can be able to probe your bearded dragon successfully. Female bearded dragon reaches sexual maturity and starts to breed between eight to eighteen months. A female bearded dragon can lay eggs about 20 in each clutch. The eggs if they are fertile, will hatch in fifty-five to seventy-five days. In female bearded dragons, unmated females may also lay eggs. Female bearded dragons also display behavior.

Key Differences

  1. Male bearded dragons are more aggressive conversely female dragons are less aggressive.
  2. Male dragons have large beards, whereas female dragons have small beards.
  3. Male dragons show spikes as a form of courtship on the other hand female dragons show spikes as a form of self-defense.
  4. Male bearded dragons have more prominent femoral pores on the flip side females have less prominent.
  5. Males are large, while females are smaller in size as compared to the male dragon.

Conclusion

It is concluded that male bearded dragon has a wider tail having two bulges and females has small, slender tail having only one bulge.

Author:

Aimie Carlson

Aimie Carlson is an English language enthusiast who loves writing and has a master degree in English literature. Follow her on Twitter at @AimieCarlson

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