Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Main Difference

The main difference between Atlas Vertebrae and Axis Vertebrae is that Atlas Vertebrae are the uppermost vertebra which grips the skull while Axis Vertebra is the second uppermost vertebra which delivers an axis to turn the skull and atlas vertebra when the head moves side to side.

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Atlas Vertebrae and Axis Vertebrae

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas denotes to the highest vertebra of the backbone, articulating with the occipital bone of the skull while axis indicates to the second cervical vertebra, which helps as a pivot for turning the head.

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas is the first cervical vertebra whereas the axis is the second cervical vertebra.

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas deficiencies a spinous process but axis contains a large, very tough, and deeply channel spinous process.

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas absences both superior and inferior articular disks, conversely axis comprises of both superior and inferior articular discs.

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas comprises a section for articulation with the odontoid process oppositely axis comprises an odontoid process, which utters with the atlas.

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas grips the head upright while axis permits the head to turn side by side.

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Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas vertebrae are also known as C1 vertebra on the other hand axis vertebrae is also known as C2 vertebra.

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas vertebrae permit the “yes” motion of the head whereas axis vertebrae Permit the “no” motion of the head.

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas vertebrae do not hold a projection, unlike axis vertebrae, comprise a vertical projection known as “Dens.”

Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas vertebrae do not deal an axis to rotate the skull oppositely axis vertebrae delivers an axis for skull rotation.

Comparison Chart

Atlas axisAxis atlas
The first cervical vertebrae of the vertebral columnThe second cervical vertebra of the vertebral column
Synonyms
C1 vertebraeC2 vertebrae
Head motion
Allows the “yes” motion of the headAllows the “no” motion of the head
Projection
Does not contain a projectioncontain a vertical projection known as “Dens.”
Recyclability
Does not offer an axis to rotate the skullOffers a shaft for skull rotation
Superiority
Most superior vertebraSecond most superior vertebra
Functions
Holds the head upright and allows the motion of the headLinks the spine and the skull and provides head motions
Importance
Important to grip the head uprightVital as it encases the entire brain stem and crucial for human organizations’ survival and functionality
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Atlas Vertebrae vs. Axis Vertebrae

Atlas denotes to the highest vertebra of the backbone, uttering with the occipital bone of the skull while axis indicates to the second cervical vertebra, which helps as a pivot for turning the head. Atlas is the first cervical vertebra whereas the axis is the second cervical vertebra.

Atlas absences a spinous process while axis comprises of a large, very tough, and deeply channel spinous process. Atlas lacks both superior and inferior articular disks; axis consists of both superior and inferior articular disks.

Atlas comprises a section for articulation with the odontoid process while axis comprises an odontoid process, which articulates with the atlas. Atlas holds the head erect while axis permits the head to turn side by side. Atlas vertebrae also are known as C1 vertebra whereas axis vertebrae are also known as C2 vertebra.

Atlas vertebrae allow the “yes” motion of the head whereas axis vertebrae allow the “no” motion of the head. Atlas vertebrae do not comprise a projection whereas axis vertebrae comprise a vertical projection known as “Dens.” Atlas vertebrae do not deliver an axis to rotate the skull whereas axis vertebrae offer a shaft for skull rotation.

What is Atlas Vertebrae?

Atlas vertebra (C1 vertebra) is the higher vertebra of the vertebral column. Atlas vertebra is the first cervical vertebra of the spine, name from the mythical Greek god who is carrying the world on his shoulders. Atlas is the first vertebra in which the head rests.

The atlas is to sustenance the globe of the head as it holds the skull up. The “yes” motion of the head is potential due to this vertebra. Atlas vertebra is between the skull and axis vertebra. It contains two anterior and posterior arches and two lateral masses. It articulates with the occipital bone, which is a healthy bone at the posterior portion of the head.

The superior articular features of the atlas are concave and lengthen, getting the condyles of the occipital bone. Articulating with the second cervical vertebra, allows the head to attain a wide variety of motions. The atlas vertebra comprises an oval articulation for the dens of the axis.

The atlas bone contains a typical structure in association to the other vertebrae in the spine. Atlas is a ring-like vertebra, which does not comprise a vertebral body. The main constituents of the atlas vertebra are the vertebral notches, facets, anterior and posterior arches and tubercles, and transverse processes.

What is the Axis Vertebrae?

Axis (C2) vertebra is the second topmost cervical vertebra of the spine. It is nearby to atlas vertebra and C3 vertebra. Head rotates owing to the axis vertebra. It permits the “no” motion of the head. It contains a vertical projection known as “dens.”

The leading feature of the axis vertebra is the occurrence of an odontoid process or dens to articulate with the atlas. This articulation makes a pivot between the atlas and the axis. This joint is known as the Atlanta-axial joint, and its primary function is to permit the head to rotate around the neck.

Axis does not comprise a vertebral body. Significantly, the lack of the vertebral body also supports the extensive range of motions reachable by the head. Axial vertebra links the skull and the spine. It also covers the entire brain stem. Therefore, it is a significant bone for the human systems’ survival and functionality.

Conclusion

Above this discussion, it concludes that atlas and axis vertebrae are two cervical vertebrae of the vertebral column. Atlas vertebra is the most superior vertebra as it grips the head upright whereas axis vertebra is the second higher vertebra of the vertebral column as it covers the brain stem, and it permits most of the head motions.