Difference Between Worse and Worst

Main Difference

The difference between Worse and worst is that Worse is defined as of lower quality or a lower standard. Worse is known as a comparative adjective. Comparative adjective are used to compare two things with each other. While on the other hand Worst is defined as of the lowest quality or the lowest standard. Worst is known as a superlative adjective. Superlative adjective are used when you compare three or more things with one another.

Worse vs. Worst

Both these words, worse and worst are quite similar when it is about the spelling or pronunciation of them. That is why these words are used interchangeably, but one needs to know the comprehensive meaning and usage of both these words to differentiate it between one and other. Worse and Worst can be used as different parts of speech, but most prominently they are recognized as adjectives. Worse is the comparative adjective, whereas worst is known as the superlative adjective. From this one can know that worse is used in comparison between two things, people or conditions. It is the comparative adjective used for the ‘bad’ or of the ‘poorer quality’. On the other hand, worst is the superlative degree that is used to compare it between more than two things, people or conditions. It is the superlative form of adjective used for ‘bad’ or of the ‘poorest quality’.

Comparison Chart

WorseWorst
Type of AdjectiveIt is the comparative adjective used for the ‘bad’ or of the ‘poorer qualityIt is the superlative form of adjective used for ‘bad’ or of the ‘poorest quality’.
VerbIt can’t be used as verb.It can be used as verb.

What is Worse?

The word worse can be used as different parts of speech in written or verbal communication. Most prominently it is used as an adjective, a comparative adjective that shows comparison between two things, persons or situations. It would be kept in noticed that whenever we talk about comparison or the comparison adjective, we compare two although in superlative case it is always more than two as it is the extreme case. Apart from being used as comparative adjective, the word ‘worse’ can also be used as adverb and noun but it can never be used as the verb in the sentence. The word worse carries diverse meanings with respect the usage in different sentence, the examples below would make you clearer about its meaning under different contexts.

Examples of Usage of Worse

As Adjective‘Of poorer quality or lower standard’: This tastes worse than last night’s dinner.

‘More serious or severe’: James yesterdays’ injury was worse than last month’s injury.

As Noun‘A more serious or unpleasant event or situation’: It was already 2-0 for Barcelona, but the worse was yet to come.

What is Worst?

The word ‘worst’ refers to the superlative adjective of ‘bad’ or of the ‘poorest quality’. It shows the comparison between more than two people, things, or situations. Technically, it is the irregular superlative adjective, which means that it doesn’t follows the typical pattern of such adjectives. It is the superlative adjectives as it doesn’t have ‘-est’ addition in it to refer to the extreme degree. With simple word ‘worst’, it denotes the highest or extreme degree of being ill bad or poorer in quality. It is also used diversely as different part of speech but it is mainly known as an adjective. The word ‘worst’ can also be used as a verb, but the word ‘worse’ can never be used as verb. As a verb ‘worst’ means to “defeat thoroughly.”

Examples of Usage of Worst

As Verb‘Defeat thoroughly’: ‘They are tired enough so they can be worsted right now.’

Worse vs. Worst

  • Worse is the comparative adjective, whereas worst is known as the superlative adjective.
  • The word ‘worst’ can also be used as a verb, but the word ‘worse’ can never be used as verb.
  • Technically, both the words worse and worst are irregular superlative adjective, which means that they don’t follows the typical pattern of common adjective degrees.

Comparison Video

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Aimie Carlson

Aimie Carlson is an English language enthusiast who loves writing and has a master degree in English literature. Follow her on Twitter at @AimieCarlson

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