EnglishWords

Difference Between Spend and Spent

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Main Difference

The main difference between Spend and Spent is that the Spend refers to the present action, whereas Spent is known to be the past and past participle of ‘spend,’ the verb spent directs an action of the past action.

Spend vs. Spent

The word spend is an irregular verb that means “to pay money for something.” Another meaning of the verb spend is”to pass the time in a particular scenario or a particular place.” The verb spend refers to the present action; on the other hand, the verb spent directs an action of the past. Spend is the present simple form of the verb, while the word spent is known to be the past and past participle of ‘spend.’ Spend is the first form of verb of the same word, whereas spent is the third form of the verb. The tenses in which the first form “spend” is used are simple, progressive, perfect, and perfect progressive. All the past tenses are having the third form of the verb, i.e., “spent.” Moreover, this third form is also used when we make the passive voice of the simple present, simple past, simple future, and perfect tenses.

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Spend is not used in such a manner or context the way; on the contrary, spent refers to the meaning “exhausted or given away.” In the parts of speech, spend falls into the category of a verb. Spent is a verb as well as an adjective. Spend denotes the present and future, while spent directs the past. The pronunciation of the word spend is /spɛnd/ with a d sound in the end. Spent has the pronunciation /spɛnt/ with a distinction of t sound in the end. Spend is used for the quantities that can be measurable, e.g., time and money. Spent is used for various types of functions.

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Comparison Chart

SpendSpent
It means expending the money or time in a specified manner or locationIt conveys the meaning that a thing has no longer left with any power or effectiveness
Part of speech
VerbAdjective and verb
Pronunciation
/spɛnd//spɛnt/
Time
Present and futurePast
Form of Verb
FirstThird

What is Spend?

Spend is known as an irregular verb having two meanings. The first meaning is “to use money in exchange for something.” The second meaning is “to pass the time in a specific manner or in a particular location.” Spend is generally used for the quantities that can be measurable, e.g., time and money. The word ‘spend’ demonstrates the continuing action or cost to be completed in the future. That is why it is an ongoing procedure. The pronunciation of the word spend is /spɛnd/ with a d sound in the end.

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Spend indicates present and future, e.g., I will spend the money on giving a treat to my friends (Future). They spend most of your time in the garden (Present). The word ‘spend’ does not reveal the completeness of an action, e.g., “I must spend some money for charity purpose. Will you spend your Sunday at aunt’s home?”

Examples

  • My friend uses to spend almost $100 a month.
  • We are planning to spend next weekend at the beach.
  • People spend a lot of their time using mobile phones.
  • We should spend our money on useful tasks.
  • Let’s spend the holiday at Emma’s place.

What is Spent?

The word spent is a verb and an adjective. It is the simple past and past participle of the word ‘spend.’ It conveys the meaning that a thing, money, time, or effort has been expended. The word spent indicates that a thing has no longer remained with the power or effectiveness, e.g., Spent of all her energy, she felon the sofa and asked for a glass of banana shake. Moreover, it demonstrates that a thing is unable to be used again, e.g., Someone put a spent matchstick back in the matchbox.

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Spent has a broader spectrum than its synonyms, i.e., invest. It also refers to the expenditure of things other than money and effort. Spent is mainly used to indicate the past, e.g., I spent the whole weekend in Hawai. Spent is applicable for things, people, animals, and time, e.g., She spent her energy doing morning exercise (people). Alas! I spent my energy on a useless task (things). Spent indicates an action that is achieved or completed, e.g., Sarah spent her whole salary on shopping. I demonstrate a thing that is not left

Examples

  • My father has spent her whole life in his hometown.
  • My friend is fond of pets. He spent all of his money buying them.
  • I spent my free lecture in the library reading books.
  • “Emma spent time with her grandparents in Los Angeles.
  • Though the picnic was great, I spent a sleepless night in the camp.

Key Differences

  1. The verb spend refers to a present action; on the other hand, the verb spent directs an action of the past action.
  2. Spend means expending the money or time in a specified manner or location; in contrast, spent conveys the meaning that a thing has no longer left with any power or effectiveness.
  3. In the parts of speech, spend falls into the category of a verb, while spent is a verb, as well as an adjective.
  4. The pronunciation of the word spend is /spɛnd/; on the converse, spent has the pronunciation /spɛnt/.
  5. Spend is the present simple form of the verb; on the contrary, the word spent is known to be the past and past participle of ‘spend.’
  6. Spent is the third form of the verb; conversely, spend is the first form of verb of the same word.
  7. Spend is used for the quantities that can be measurable, e.g., time and money inversely spent is used for various types of functions.
  8. Spend denotes present and future on the flip side spent directs the past.
  9. The tenses in which the first form “spend” is used are simple, progressive, perfect and perfect progressive, on the other hand, the past tenses, and the passive voice of the simple present, simple past, simple future, and perfect tenses use the third form of the verb “spent.”

Comparison Video

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Conclusion

Spend and Spent are the two different forms of verbs of the same word. They are different based on the difference in their usage.

Aimie Carlson

Aimie Carlson is an English language enthusiast who loves writing and has a master degree in English literature. Follow her on Twitter at @AimieCarlson

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