Reporter vs. Anchor

Reporter vs. Anchor — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Reporter and Anchor

Reporternoun

Someone or something that reports.

The reporters of important security bugs may be paid a bounty by the software developer.

Anchornoun

(nautical) A tool used to moor a vessel to the bottom of a sea or river to resist movement.

Reporternoun

A journalist who investigates, edits and reports news stories for newspapers, radio and television.

Anchornoun

(nautical) An iron device so shaped as to grip the bottom and hold a vessel at her berth by the chain or rope attached. (FM 55-501).

Reporternoun

A person who records and issues official reports of judicial or legislative proceedings.

Anchornoun

(nautical) The combined anchoring gear (anchor, rode, bill/peak and fittings such as bitts, cat, and windlass.)

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Reporternoun

(legal) A case reporter; a bound volume of printed legal opinions from a particular jurisdiction.

Anchornoun

(heraldry) Representation of the nautical tool, used as a heraldic charge.

Reporternoun

(biology) A gene attached by a researcher to a regulatory sequence of another gene of interest, typically used as an indication of whether a certain gene has been taken up by or expressed in the cell or organism population.

Anchornoun

Any instrument serving a purpose like that of a ship's anchor, such as an arrangement of timber to hold a dam fast; a device to hold the end of a bridge cable etc.; or a device used in metalworking to hold the core of a mould in place.

Reporternoun

a person who investigates and reports or edits news stories

Anchornoun

(Internet) A marked point in a document that can be the target of a hyperlink.

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Anchornoun

(television) An anchorman or anchorwoman.

Anchornoun

(athletics) The final runner in a relay race.

Anchornoun

(archery) A point that is touched by the draw hand or string when the bow is fully drawn and ready to shoot.

Anchornoun

(economics) A superstore or other facility that serves as a focus to bring customers into an area.

Anchornoun

(figurative) That which gives stability or security.

Anchornoun

(architecture) A metal tie holding adjoining parts of a building together.

Anchornoun

(architecture) Carved work, somewhat resembling an anchor or arrowhead; part of the ornaments of certain mouldings. It is seen in the echinus, or egg-and-anchor (called also egg-and-dart, egg-and-tongue) ornament.

Anchornoun

One of the anchor-shaped spicules of certain sponges.

Anchornoun

One of the calcareous spinules of certain holothurians, as in species of Synapta.

Anchornoun

(cartomancy) The thirty-fifth Lenormand card.

Anchornoun

(obsolete) An anchorite or anchoress.

Anchorverb

To connect an object, especially a ship or a boat, to a fixed point.

Anchorverb

To cast anchor; to come to anchor.

Our ship (or the captain) anchored in the stream.

Anchorverb

To stop; to fix or rest.

Anchorverb

To provide emotional stability for a person in distress.

Anchorverb

To perform as an anchorman or anchorwoman.

Anchorverb

To be stuck; to be unable to move away from a position.

Anchornoun

a mechanical device that prevents a vessel from moving

Anchornoun

a central cohesive source of support and stability;

faith is his anchorthe keystone of campaign reform was the ban on soft moneyhe is the linchpin of this firm

Anchornoun

a television reporter who coordinates a broadcast to which several correspondents contribute

Anchorverb

fix firmly and stably;

anchor the lamppost in concrete

Anchorverb

secure a vessel with an anchor;

We anchored at Baltimore