Education

Difference Between Practice and Practise

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Main Difference

In the US, practice and practise are same. But in the UK both are different . In UK practice is used as noun and practise is used as verb. A doctor with a private practice practises privately. Here practice is used as a noun and practise is used as a verb. Practice makes the man perfect, so she practises the guitar every day. Here practice is used as noun and practises is used as verb.

What is Practice?

Practice refers to an act itself, not who is doing it. Practice is a noun as it contains ice in its end. Ice is a word. e.g. I have done my football practice. Practice makes the man perfect.

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What is Practise?

It means to do something repeatedly to improve a skill. Practise is used as verb as it contains ise in its end. Ise is not a word so it is a verb not a noun. e.g. I practise my guitar. He is practising cricket. I practise my cycle.

Key Differences

  1. Practice means to an act itself, not who is doing it while practise means to do something repeatedly to improve a skill.
  2. Practice and practise are same in US.
  3. Practise and practice are different in UK. Practice is a noun and Practise is a verb.
  4. Practice contains ice at its end while practise contains ise in its end.
  5. Ice at the end of practice is a word while ise in the end of practise is not a word.
  6. A doctor with a private practice practises privately. Here practice is used as a noun and practise is used as a verb.
  7. Practice makes the man perfect, so she practises the guitar every day. Here practice is used as noun and practises is used as verb.
  8. I think I am out of practice so I daily practise my English.
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Aimie Carlson

Aimie Carlson is an English language enthusiast who loves writing and has a master degree in English literature. Follow her on Twitter at @AimieCarlson

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