Difference Between Loose and Lose

Main Difference

The main difference between loose and lose is that the loose is an adjective that means “not tight” and lose is a verb that means “to free oneself from something or someone, to fail to win, or to misplace.”

Loose vs. Lose

The words loose and lose are sometimes mixed up in writing. But both the words have different connotative and denotative meaning. They are used differently in different contexts. Loose is an adjective, meaning “not tight.” Lose is a verb meaning to misplace, to free oneself from something or someone or to fail to win. The alphabet O distinguishes loose from lose. The adjective and verb loose mean to release something from restraints and set it free. The verb ‘lose’ means to be deprived of something. ‘Loose’ rhymes with goose. Lose rhymes with snooze when said aloud. Loose is the opposite of contained or tight. Lose means “to suffer the loss of, to miss.” It is the opposite of “get, achieve, etc.” The examples of loose are my pajamas are loose, she has a loose tooth, a cat is running loose in the street. The examples of lose are you need to lose some weight; I wish I do not lose this tooth. He never loses bets.

Comparison Chart

LooseLose
An adjective that means “not tight.” or A verb that to set free, release from fastenings or restraintsA verb that means “to free oneself from something or someone, to fail to win, or to misplace
Alphabetic Difference
Addition of an extra OThe omission of an O
Rhymes with
GooseSnooze
Antonyms
Tight, containedGet, achieve

What is Loose?

The word ‘loose’ functions as an adjective as well as a verb. Loose as an adjective, means compact or dense, not firmly or tightly held in place, or not and free from restraint or confinement. When acting as a verb, loose means to set free, release from fastenings or restraints and to undo. Loose rhymes with goose and moose. It is almost used as an adjective. It also means “free from restraints or binds, not bound together, or not fitting closely or tightly.” It also refers to something that is not very strict, or that is relaxed or limber.

Examples

  • The cat runs loose in the street.
  • I have a loose tooth.
  • Drive slowly on this loose gravel road.
  • She let her hair hang
  • The trousers were loose on me, so I bought the next size down.
  • Can you tight this? It’s loose.
  • I have a loose idea of going to a picnic tomorrow, but things could change.

What is Lose?

The word lose functions as a verb. The common meanings of the verb lose are “to be deprived of or cease to have or retain (something one once had); become unable to find (someone or something); to fail to win, or to fail to use or take advantage of.” Lose describes when you “come to be without something” (e.g., to lose a cap in the laundry) or “to suffer defeat” (e.g., to lose a game). Its spelling might give an impression that it rhymes with hose and chose, but it rhymes with choose and shoes. The S in loose has a Z sound. Lose has a Z sound to it when said aloud. It rhymes with snooze and choose. The phrase “to lose” expresses no longer having something. It may also be used when you can not find anything.

Examples

  • I am going to lose my mind if you carry on speaking.
  • I lost all of my photos in flood.
  • You are not supposed to lose this opportunity. Get this in any case!
  • The business is going to lose six million dollars this year.

Key Differences

  1. Loose is an adjective that means not bound together, not tight, or not fitting closely or tightly whereas lose is a verb that means “to misplace, to free oneself from something or someone or to fail to win.”
  2. The word loose has an additional alphabet O (double ‘O’) conversely the word lose only has a single O.
  3. The adjective and verb loose mean to release something from restraints and set it free on the flip side. The verb lose means to get deprived of something.
  4. Loose’ rhymes with a goose, on the other hand, lose rhymes with snooze when said aloud.
  5. The antonyms of loose are “tight” or “contained while the antonyms of lose are “get, achieve, etc.”

Conclusion

Loose and lose are two words that are different from each other and cannot be interchanged.

Aimie Carlson

Aimie Carlson is an English language enthusiast who loves writing and has a master degree in English literature. Follow her on Twitter at @AimieCarlson

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