Difference Between Fate and Destiny

Main Difference

The future is successor to the present, even many people living in their current or present are curious about their future. Many of them who got pessimist accepts things as part of the fate, on the other hand those who get optimistic and have self believe in destiny. With the above sentence one thing is clear that both these words are regarding the future, one with the positive and other suggesting the negative connotation. Destiny is the event that necessarily happens to someone in future, though it can be changed with person’s dedication, hard work, courage and patience, whereas fate is the predetermined event in someone’s’ future by a supernatural power that is inevitable or unavoidable with humanly intervention.

Comparison Chart

FateDestiny
MeaningFate is the predetermined event in someone’s’ future by a supernatural power that is inevitable or unavoidable with humanly intervention.Destiny is the event that necessarily happens to someone in future, though it can be changed with person’s dedication, hard work, courage and patience.
Optimistic or PessimistMany of them who got pessimist accepts things as part of their fate.Those who get optimistic and have self believe in destiny.
ConnotationsFate is usually associated with the negative connotation.Destiny is perceived as positive connotation
DerivedThe term fate is taken from theword Latin fatum meaning ‘that which has been spoken’.The term destiny is derived from Latin word ‘destinata’, which means to establish or make firm.

What is Fate?

It is an predetermined event planned by the supernatural power (God or else) that has to happen in ones life regardless of any humanly interference. In some parts of the world fate is regarded as something finalized by creator for someone. The specific event happens in the similar way as scheduled at any cost. Generally speaking we can say that fate is an event in someones life that is inevitable. Usually fate is perceived in the negative connotation, it can also be positive in some situations as it unfolds an event which was much desired by an individual or worked as hindrance in an event that later led to faulty ending. According to the Oxford Dictionaries, fate is defined as ‘the development of events outside a person’s control, regarded as predetermined by a supernatural power.’

Positive Connotation: ‘Had fate brought Selina to these people who welcomed her as if she were family?’

Negative Connotation: Shaun’s injury is a cruel twist of fate.’

What is Destiny?

Destiny is the event that necessarily happens to someone in future, though it can be changed with person’s dedication, hard work, courage and patience. The actual difference between destiny and fate is that latter can’t be changed, whereas former can be changed with humanly intervention. It is always taken up as in the positive gesture and makes one optimistic as he/she believes that they can change the certain happening by their own. Destiny is quite positively perceived and it is also usually said that destiny is reward of ones good doing. According to the Oxford Dictionaries, destiny is ‘the hidden power believed to control future events.’

Fate vs. Destiny

  • Destiny is the event that necessarily happens to someone in future, though it can be changed with person’s dedication, hard work, courage and patience, whereas fate is the predetermined event in someone’s’ future by a supernatural power that is inevitable or unavoidable with humanly intervention.
  • Many of them who got pessimist accepts things as part of their fate, on the other hand those who get optimistic and have self believe in destiny.
  • Fate is usually associated with the negative connotations, whereas destiny is perceived as positive connotation.
  • The term destiny is derived from Latin word ‘destinata’, which means to establish or make firm, on the other hand, term fate is taken from theword Latin fatum meaning ‘that which has been spoken’.

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Aimie Carlson

Aimie Carlson is an English language enthusiast who loves writing and has a master degree in English literature. Follow her on Twitter at @AimieCarlson

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