Difference Between Facetious and Sarcastic

Main Difference

Language is all what needed for human communication, though with the passage of time it has became so advance that it posses statements like Facetious and Sarcastic, that serve the similar purpose but in a totally different manner. A Facetious statement or a remark is the witty remark that comes against the serious topic. The sole purpose of the factious remark is to bring out laughter and to respond with a humors reply on some serious situation, whereas sarcastic statement or remark is a satirical remark having irony to mock and to show disdain against any certain situation or statement. “Sarcastic” or “sarcasm” is derived from the Greek word “sarkamos” which means “to sneer” while “facetious” is derived from the Latin word “facetus” that means “witty.”

Comparison Chart

FacetiousSarcastic
DefinitionA Facetious statement or a remark is the witty remark that comes against the serious topic.A Sarcastic statement or remark is a satirical remark having irony to mock and to show disdain against any certain situation or statement.
Origin“Sarcastic” or “sarcasm” is derived from the Greek word “sarkamos” which means “to sneer”.“Facetious” is derived from the Latin word “facetus” that means “witty.”
AimThe aim of factious remark is to spread laughter.Sarcastic remark shows the bitter reality and carries on a serious message.
ExampleHow do you know that carrots are good for eyes?. ‘I never saw rabbit wearing glasses.’‘I don’t know what makes you so dumb but it really works.’

What is Factious?

Factious is a flippant remark that indents to bring out witty side of some serious issue or topic. Sometimes the factious can even be odd as it shows a contrast to the ongoing situation, though it isn’t taken that seriously as it is just a meant to add up humor in some serious ongoing’s. Facetious is derived from the Latin word “facetus” that means “witty.” In some situations a factious comment can be a sarcastic comment too if it has certain satire or irony against the situation. People often intermix factious remark with the witty remark, though it should be kept noticed that factious is itself witty but the situation it comes against makes it differentiable to the usual witty remark. Generally, factious remark is not to mock someone it is just a humors comment over some serious situation.

Example: How do you know that carrots are good for eyes?. ‘I never saw rabbit wearing glasses.’ It is a factious remark that comes in response of some serious question.

What is Sarcastic?

Sarcastic is a satirical remark that mocks a certain situation or person as it shows ones’ disapproval to that particular situation. A sarcastic remake may consist of taunts, or even be witty sometime. Actually this remark means totally different to what it is actually being said or written as it is satirical take showing irony. Actually it seems that all is all well in the situation as a sarcastic remark looks a pleasant one, though it caries on a hidden meaning or a bitter truth that is all set for mocking purpose. “Sarcastic” or “sarcasm” is derived from the Greek word “sarkamos” which means “to sneer”. Sarcastic remarks or comments are nowadays quite popular on social media as they bring spotlight on the matter in a totally different way.

Example: ‘I don’t know what makes you so dumb but it really works.’ The remark is intended to do insult but that in a calm and sophisticated manner.

Facetious vs. Sarcastic

  • A Facetious statement or a remark is the witty remark that comes against the serious topic, whereas sarcastic statement or remark is a satirical remark having irony to mock and to show disdain against any certain situation or statement.
  • “Sarcastic” or “sarcasm” is derived from the Greek word “sarkamos” which means “to sneer”, while “facetious” is derived from the Latin word “facetus” that means “witty.”
  • The aim of factious remark is to spread laughter whereas sarcastic remark shows the bitter reality and carries on a serious message.
Aimie Carlson

Aimie Carlson is an English language enthusiast who loves writing and has a master degree in English literature. Follow her on Twitter at @AimieCarlson

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