Difference Between Cheese and Butter

Main Difference

The main difference between cheese and butter is that the cheese is primarily made by curd or the semisolid substance formed after the milk coagulation process and butter is made by churning the cream separated from milk.

Cheese vs. Butter

Cheese is a milk product which is made by the coagulation of milk protein casein from the milk of cows, buffalo, goats or sheep. It is available in different flavors and textures in the market. Butter is made by beating the milk or fermented cream, and then butterfat is separated from the buttermilk after that. Cheese is commonly used in pasta, pizza, or as a toast spread. Butter is used in cooking or baking, or for greasing the baking tray. Cheese and butter are both dairy products, but they are made using different methods. They greatly differ from each other in terms of taste due to this difference. Cheese is very low in fats as compared to the butter. Butter is made from the cream of fresh milk. Cheese is made from curd churned from the milk. Cheese is lower in fats and calories and richer in vitamin and mineral content. The calcium content in cheese keeps the teeth and bones strong and lowers the risk of osteoporosis. Butter is mostly just fat because churning accumulates all the fats from the milk. It contains very little protein. One hundred grams of cheese contains 349 calories. One hundred grams of butter has 717 calories. Cheese contains nutrients like zinc and biotin that aids tissue growth in the body, prevents muscles degeneration, protects the skin, and keeps hair and nails strong. Butter contains some healthy fatty acids that are essential for maintaining thyroid and adrenal health. It also has antimicrobial properties that are useful for fighting pathogenic microorganisms thriving in the intestinal tract.

Comparison Chart

CheeseButter
A dairy product made by curd or the semisolid substance formed after the milk coagulation processA dairy product made by churning the cream separated from the milk
Calcium
Rich in CalciumContains Calcium
Fats
Lower FatHigher Fat
Calories in 100g
349717
Proteins in 100 g
100 grams0.8 grams

What is Cheese?

Cheese is a milk product that is derived from milk. It comprises fats and proteins that come from the milk of cows, buffalos, sheep, or goats. The flavor and texture of cheese may vary depending on the origin of the milk, also including the animal’s diet. There are different types of cheese. The process of cheesemaking may differ from one to another, but all of these processes involve the following four steps:

  • Curdling: Curding of milk is done using a lactic starter or an enzyme called rennin. This milk is cut into cube shape and then heated. The curd cubes shrink later because of heat and also the acid formation is increased.
  • Draining: It removes, the liquid content forms the curd. The remaining liquid portion of milk (whey) is drained, and then the curd is again cut into small cubes. These cubes are kept under pressure overnight, and if there is still moisture present in the final product, then its proportion classifies the cheese as hard, semi-soft, or soft cheese.
  • Pressing: Pressing makes use of mold or form in which the curds are pressed. These molds expel moisture, and the cheese becomes drier and firmer as a result.
  • Ripening: Ripening stage also called the maturation stage is all about setting the right temperature, moisture, and oxygen to affect microbes present in the cheese. These microbes work to create a unique aroma and texture of cheese.

Nutritional Values of 100 g cheese

  • 100 g Proteins
  • 79 g Fats
  • 1045 mg Calcium
  • 132 mg Potassium
  • 63 mg Iron
  • 1671 mg of Sodium

What is Butter?

Butter is a milk product that is made by separating the butterfat from the milk through the process of churning fresh or fermented cream or milk. It often is made from cow’s milk, but can also be made goats, buffalo, yaks, and sheep milk. In the production of butter, milk is churned until the fats set apart from the liquid and the butter gets a semi-liquid state. Butter gives you an instant burst of energy, and it is essential in maintaining thyroid and adrenal health. Butter helps in fighting pathogenic microorganisms, which develops in the intestinal tracts with its antimicrobial properties. Finally formed butter after churning has a characteristic property known as spreadability, which is not present in substitutes used by people in place of butter. This spreadability is a result of glyceride structures of butterfat and also because of the presence of saturated fatty acids. The commercial process of making butter is:

  • First, the fresh milk is collected and is brought to the creamery.
  • Here, the cream is separated from whole milk with the use of centrifugal force.
  • Milk is heating for pasteurization after that.
  • Then the cream is put into a churning apparatus or cylinder where it is beaten vigorously.
  • The process of churning takes place until it forms butter.
  • Remaining buttermilk is drained.

Nutritional values of 100 grams of butter

  • 81 grams of fat with 3.3 grams of trans fats and 51 grams of saturated fats
  • 8 grams of protein
  • 717 calories

Key Differences

  1. Cheese is a milk product which is made by the coagulation of milk protein casein whereas butter is also a milk product made by beating or churning the milk or cream.
  2. Cheese is used in pasta, pizza, or as a toast spread, on the other hand, butter is used in cooking or baking, or for greasing the baking tray.
  3. Cheese is very low in fats conversely butter is mostly just fat because churning accumulates all the fats from the milk.
  4. Cheese is made from curd churned from the milk on the flip side butter is made from the cream of fresh milk.
  5. Cheese reduces risk of osteoporosis, hypertension, tooth decay, and heart diseases while butter helps in treating fungal infections, has anti-tumor and anti-cancer properties, and builds up muscles.

Conclusion

Butter and cheese are both dairy products that are different from each other in their taste, texture, flavors, color, and mainly the process of their extraction.

Aimie Carlson

Aimie Carlson is an English language enthusiast who loves writing and has a master degree in English literature. Follow her on Twitter at @AimieCarlson

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