Difference Wiki

Alkali vs. Base

The main difference between Alkali and Base is that Alkali is the type of base that can dissolve in water, whereas Base is a substance that can neutralize the acid.

Key Differences

Alkali form ionic compounds, whereas base form both ionic and covalent compounds.
All alkali compounds can be said as bases, while the base cannot be said as alkali.
Janet White
Jan 03, 2021
Alkali contains group 1 metal oxides and hydroxides; on the other hand, bases contain oxide ions and hydroxide ions.
Alkali compounds are soluble in the water; on the flip side, bases are insoluble.
Word alkali is only for the alkaline metals; conversely, word base can be used for any compound that posses basic properties.
Alkali releases OH ions, although bases neutralize the acid.
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Alkali doesn’t exhibit the property to release OH ions comparatively base does exhibit the property to release OH ions.
As compared to the alkali, the base has a higher capacity to accept the protons.
Alkali releases hydrogen ions and produces hydroxide ions. However, the base has the ability to reduce hydrogen ion concentration.
Janet White
Jan 03, 2021
Alkali never contains in a pure salt; on the other side, the base contains in the form of pure salt.
Samantha Walker
Jan 03, 2021

Comparison Chart

.

Term alkali is referred to as the metals of group 1 of the periodic table.
Compounds possess OH ions that can donate to other compounds.

Nature

Dissolve in water.
Do not dissolve in water.
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Examples

Potassium hydroxide, Sodium hydroxide, Calcium hydroxide, etc
Zinc oxide, Copper oxide, Ferric oxide, Magnesium oxide, etc

Compounds Mainly

Hydroxides and carbonates
Any compound that can donate electrons

Function

Neutralize the compound
Accept protons
Aimie Carlson
Jan 03, 2021

Alkali and Base Definitions

Alkali

A carbonate or hydroxide of an alkali metal, the aqueous solution of which is bitter, slippery, caustic, and characteristically basic in reactions.

Base

The lowest or bottom part
The base of a cliff.
The base of a lamp.

Alkali

Any of various soluble mineral salts found in natural water and arid soils.
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Base

The part of a plant or animal organ that is nearest to its point of attachment.

Alkali

Alkali metal.

Base

The point of attachment of such an organ.

Alkali

A substance having highly basic properties; a strong base.

Base

A supporting part or layer; a foundation
A skyscraper built on a base of solid rock.

Alkali

(chemistry) One of a class of caustic bases, such as soda, soda ash, caustic soda, potash, ammonia, and lithia, whose distinguishing characteristics are dissolving in alcohol and water, uniting with oils and fats to form soap, neutralizing and forming salts with acids, turning to brown several vegetable yellows, and changing reddened litmus to blue.

Base

A basic or underlying element; infrastructure
The nation's industrial base.

Alkali

(Western United States) Soluble mineral matter, other than common salt, contained in soils of natural waters.

Base

The fundamental principle or underlying concept of a system or theory; a basis.

Alkali

Soda ash; caustic soda, caustic potash, etc.

Base

A fundamental ingredient; a chief constituent
A paint with an oil base.

Alkali

One of a class of caustic bases, such as soda, potash, ammonia, and lithia, whose distinguishing peculiarities are solubility in alcohol and water, uniting with oils and fats to form soap, neutralizing and forming salts with acids, turning to brown several vegetable yellows, and changing reddened litmus to blue.

Base

The fact, observation, or premise from which a reasoning process is begun.

Alkali

Soluble mineral matter, other than common salt, contained in soils of natural waters.

Base

(Games) A starting point, safety area, or goal.

Alkali

Any of various water-soluble compounds capable of turning litmus blue and reacting with an acid to form a salt and water;
Bases include oxides and hydroxides of metals and ammonia

Base

(Baseball) Any one of the four corners of an infield, marked by a bag or plate, that must be touched by a runner before a run can be scored.

Alkali

A mixture of soluble salts found in arid soils and some bodies of water; detrimental to agriculture

Base

A center of organization, supply, or activity; a headquarters.

Base

The portion of a social organization, especially a political party, consisting of the most dedicated or motivated members.

Base

A fortified center of operations.

Base

A supply center for a large force of military personnel.

Base

A facial cosmetic used to even out the complexion or provide a surface for other makeup; a foundation.

Base

(Architecture) The lowest part of a structure, such as a wall, considered as a separate unit
The base of a column.

Base

(Heraldry) The lower part of a shield.

Base

(Linguistics) A morpheme or morphemes regarded as a form to which affixes or other bases may be added.

Base

The side or face of a geometric figure to which an altitude is or is thought to be drawn.

Base

The number that is raised to various powers to generate the principal counting units of a number system. The base of the decimal system, for example, is 10.

Base

The number raised to the logarithm of a designated number in order to produce that designated number; the number at which a chosen logarithmic scale has the value 1.

Base

A line used as a reference for measurement or computations.

Base

Any of a class of compounds whose aqueous solutions are characterized by a bitter taste, a slippery feel, the ability to turn litmus blue, and the ability to react with acids to form salts.

Base

A substance that yields hydroxide ions when dissolved in water.

Base

A substance that can act as a proton acceptor.

Base

A substance that can donate a pair of electrons to form a covalent bond.

Base

The region in a transistor between the emitter and the collector.

Base

The electrode attached to this region.

Base

One of the nitrogen-containing purines (adenine and guanine) or pyrimidines (cytosine, thymine, and uracil) that occurs attached to the sugar component of DNA or RNA.

Base

A bass singer or voice.

Base

Forming or serving as a base
A base layer of soil.

Base

Situated at or near the base or bottom
A base camp for the mountain climbers.

Base

(Chemistry) Of, relating to, or containing a base.

Base

Having or showing a lack of decency; contemptible, mean-spirited, or selfish.

Base

Being a metal that is of little value.

Base

Containing such metals
Base coins.

Base

(Archaic) Of low birth, rank, or position.

Base

(Obsolete) Short in stature.

Base

To form or provide a base for
Based the new company in Portland.

Base

To find a basis for; establish
Based her conclusions on the report.
A film based on a best-selling novel.

Base

To assign to a base; station
Troops based in the Middle East.

Base

Something from which other things extend; a foundation.

Base

A supporting, lower or bottom component of a structure or object.

Base

The starting point of a logical deduction or thought; basis.

Base

A permanent structure for housing military personnel and material.

Base

The place where decisions for an organization are made; headquarters.

Base

A basic but essential component or ingredient.

Base

A substance used as a mordant in dyeing.

Base

(cosmetics) Foundation: a cosmetic cream to make the face appear uniform.

Base

(chemistry) Any of a class of generally water-soluble compounds, having bitter taste, that turn red litmus blue, and react with acids to form salts.

Base

Important areas in games and sports.

Base

A safe zone in the children's games of tag and hide-and-go-seek.

Base

(baseball) One of the four places that a runner can stand without being subject to being tagged out when the ball is in play.

Base

(architecture) The lowermost part of a column, between the shaft and the pedestal or pavement.

Base

A nucleotide's nucleobase in the context of a DNA or RNA biopolymer.

Base

(botany) The end of a leaf, petal or similar organ where it is attached to its support.

Base

(electronics) The name of the controlling terminal of a bipolar transistor (BJT).

Base

(geometry) The lowest side of a triangle or other polygon, or the lowest face of a cone, pyramid or other polyhedron laid flat.

Base

(heraldry) The lowest third of a shield or escutcheon.

Base

(heraldry) The lower part of the field. See escutcheon.

Base

(mathematics) A number raised to the power of an exponent.
The logarithm to base 2 of 8 is 3.

Base

(mathematics) radix.

Base

(topology) The set of sets from which a topology is generated.

Base

(topology) A topological space, looked at in relation to one of its covering spaces, fibrations, or bundles.

Base

(group theory) A sequence of elements not jointly stabilized by any nontrivial group element.

Base

In hand-to-hand balance, the person who supports the flyer; the person that remains in contact with the ground.

Base

(linguistics) A morpheme (or morphemes) that serves as a basic foundation on which affixes can be attached.

Base

(music) bass

Base

The smallest kind of cannon.

Base

(archaic) The housing of a horse.

Base

A kind of skirt (often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mail or other armour) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower.

Base

(obsolete) The lower part of a robe or petticoat.

Base

(obsolete) An apron.

Base

A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.

Base

(politics) A group of voters who almost always support a single party's candidates for elected office.

Base

(Marxism) The forces and relations of production that produce the necessities and amenities of life.

Base

A material that holds paint or other materials together; a binder.

Base

(aviation) base leg

Base

(slang) freebase cocaine

Base

The game of prisoners' bars.

Base

Alternative form of BASE

Base

(transitive) To give as its foundation or starting point; to lay the foundation of.

Base

(transitive) To be located (at a particular place).

Base

To act as a base; to be the person supporting the flyer.

Base

(slang) To freebase.

Base

(obsolete) Low in height; short.

Base

Low in place or position.

Base

(obsolete) Of low value or degree.

Base

(archaic) Of low social standing or rank; vulgar, common.

Base

Morally reprehensible, immoral; cowardly.

Base

Inferior; unworthy, of poor quality.

Base

(of a metal) Not considered precious or noble.

Base

Alloyed with inferior metal; debased.
Base coin
Base bullion

Base

(obsolete) Of illegitimate birth; bastard.

Base

Not classical or correct.

Base

Obsolete form of bass
The base tone of a violin

Base

(legal) Not held by honourable service.
A base estate is one held by services not honourable, or held by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant is a base tenant.

Base

Of little, or less than the usual, height; of low growth; as, base shrubs.

Base

Low in place or position.

Base

Of humble birth; or low degree; lowly; mean.

Base

Illegitimate by birth; bastard.
Why bastard? wherefore base?

Base

Of little comparative value, as metal inferior to gold and silver, the precious metals.

Base

Alloyed with inferior metal; debased; as, base coin; base bullion.

Base

Morally low. Hence: Low-minded; unworthy; without dignity of sentiment; ignoble; mean; illiberal; menial; as, a base fellow; base motives; base occupations.

Base

Not classical or correct.

Base

Deep or grave in sound; as, the base tone of a violin.

Base

Not held by honorable service; as, a base estate, one held by services not honorable; held by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant, a base tenant.

Base

The bottom of anything, considered as its support, or that on which something rests for support; the foundation; as, the base of a statue.

Base

Fig.: The fundamental or essential part of a thing; the essential principle; a groundwork.

Base

The lower part of a wall, pier, or column, when treated as a separate feature, usually in projection, or especially ornamented.

Base

That extremity of a leaf, fruit, etc., at which it is attached to its support.

Base

The positive, or non-acid component of a salt; a substance which, combined with an acid, neutralizes the latter and forms a salt; - applied also to the hydroxides of the positive elements or radicals, and to certain organic bodies resembling them in their property of forming salts with acids.

Base

The chief ingredient in a compound.

Base

A substance used as a mordant.

Base

The exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which connects the salient angles of two adjacent bastions.

Base

The line or surface constituting that part of a figure on which it is supposed to stand.

Base

The number from which a mathematical table is constructed; as, the base of a system of logarithms.

Base

A low, or deep, sound. (Mus.) (a) The lowest part; the deepest male voice. (b) One who sings, or the instrument which plays, base.
The trebles squeak for fear, the bases roar.

Base

A place or tract of country, protected by fortifications, or by natural advantages, from which the operations of an army proceed, forward movements are made, supplies are furnished, etc.

Base

The smallest kind of cannon.

Base

That part of an organ by which it is attached to another more central organ.

Base

The basal plane of a crystal.

Base

The ground mass of a rock, especially if not distinctly crystalline.

Base

The lower part of the field. See Escutcheon.

Base

The housing of a horse.

Base

A kind of skirt (often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mailed armor) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower.

Base

The lower part of a robe or petticoat.

Base

An apron.

Base

The point or line from which a start is made; a starting place or a goal in various games.
To their appointed base they went.

Base

A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.

Base

A rustic play; - called also prisoner's base, prison base, or bars.

Base

Any one of the four bounds which mark the circuit of the infield.

Base

To put on a base or basis; to lay the foundation of; to found, as an argument or conclusion; - used with on or upon.

Base

To abase; to let, or cast, down; to lower.
If any . . . based his pike.

Base

To reduce the value of; to debase.
Metals which we can not base.

Base

Any of various water-soluble compounds capable of turning litmus blue and reacting with an acid to form a salt and water;
Bases include oxides and hydroxides of metals and ammonia

Base

Installation from which a military force initiates operations;
The attack wiped out our forward bases

Base

Lowest support of a structure;
It was built on a base of solid rock
He stood at the foot of the tower

Base

Place that runner must touch before scoring;
He scrambled to get back to the bag

Base

(numeration system) the positive integer that is equivalent to one in the next higher counting place;
10 is the radix of the decimal system

Base

The bottom or lowest part;
The base of the mountain

Base

(anatomy) the part of an organ nearest its point of attachment;
The base of the skull

Base

A lower limit;
The government established a wage floor

Base

The fundamental assumptions from which something is begun or developed or calculated or explained;
The whole argument rested on a basis of conjecture

Base

A support or foundation;
The base of the lamp

Base

The bottom side of a geometric figure from which the altitude can be constructed;
The base of the triangle

Base

The most important or necessary part of something;
The basis of this drink is orange juice

Base

The place where you are stationed and from which missions start and end

Base

An intensely anti-western terrorist network that dispenses money and logistical support and training to a wide variety of radical Islamic terrorist group; has cells in more than 50 countries

Base

(linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed;
Thematic vowels are part of the stem

Base

The stock of basic facilities and capital equipment needed for the functioning of a country or area;
The industrial base of Japan

Base

The principal ingredient of a mixture;
Glycerinated gelatin is used as a base for many ointments
He told the painter that he wanted a yellow base with just a hint of green
Everything she cooked seemed to have rice as the base

Base

A flat bottom on which something is intended to sit;
A tub should sit on its own base

Base

(electronics) the part of a transistor that separates the emitter from the collector

Base

Use as a basis for; found on;
Base a claim on some observation

Base

Use (purified cocaine) by burning it and inhaling the fumes

Base

Assign to a station

Base

Serving as or forming a base;
The painter applied a base coat followed by two finishing coats

Base

(used of metals) consisting of or alloyed with inferior metal;
Base coins of aluminum
A base metal

Base

Of low birth or station (`base' is archaic in this sense);
Baseborn wretches with dirty faces
Of humble (or lowly) birth

Base

Not adhering to ethical or moral principles;
Base and unpatriotic motives
A base, degrading way of life
Cheating is dishonorable
They considered colonialism immoral
Unethical practices in handling public funds

Base

Having or showing an ignoble lack of honor or morality;
That liberal obedience without which your army would be a base rabble
Taking a mean advantage
Chok'd with ambition of the meaner sort
Something essentially vulgar and meanspirited in politics

Base

Illegitimate

Base

Debased; not genuine;
An attempt to eliminate the base coinage

Alkali vs. Base

Alkali compounds release hydroxide ions and accept protons; on the other hand, the base is a substance use to neutralize the acids to form salt and water. All alkali compounds are the type of bases. However, all bases are not said to be alkali. Elements of group 1, carbonates, and hydroxides of the periodic table are categorized as alkali elements; on the other side, such compounds that show basic properties are classified as bases singular base. Alkali is ionic salts; on the flip side, the base is not necessarily ionic salts. Alkali does not have proper ionic salts, whereas base compounds are proper ionic salts.

Alkali compounds are always the carbonates compound and hydroxide compounds of alkali metal; on the contrary, the base can be any compound that possesses hydroxide ions and pairs of lone electrons that can share. Alkali compounds are always from the alkali metals of the periodic table, while the base can be any compound that shows basic properties.

Alkali compounds don’t give OH ions when reacting with water; on the other side, base compounds give OH ions when they react with water. Alkali neutralizes the acid while dissolved in water; on the other hand, the base doesn’t have the ability to neutralize the acid, and it can’t dissolve in water. Term alkali belongs to the ionic compounds or salts containing alkaline metal that accept hydrogen ion in the solution; on the other side, the termbase belongs to the compound that produced a solution of a low concentration of hydrogen ions rather than the pure water.

What is Alkali?

We commonly use the term alkali for the elements of the group one of the Mendeleev’s periodic table. The elements of the first group are called alkali metals. This group contains Hydrogen (H), Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr) these all are the members of group 1 and known as alkali metals. The hydrogen element behaves somewhat differently from all other members of the group. Alkali compounds are soft in nature, shiny in appearance, and silvery color; these all are some specific properties of an alkali.

Alkali possesses a single electron on its outermost shell, which they happy to remove or donate to someone and make itself cations 1+. That’s why when the alkali metals are beginning to react with their electron in the outermost shell get excited and enters the ground state and start to emitting radiation of a visible range. Alkali metals are very reactive in nature because of this exciting emitting electron. However, the reactivity of alkali metals of group 1 of the periodic table gets increases from top to bottom.

The alkali forms ionic compounds having electronegative atoms that exhibit basic properties like the bitter taste, slippery touch, and ability to neutralize the acid. Alkali also different properties like they turn red litmus to blue. They are typically burning and corrosive compounds. Alkali is also known as the soluble salt that is obtained from the ashes of such plants that possess a high concentration of potassium and sodium carbonate. Caustic soda and caustic potash are the best examples of alkali.

What is Base?

The base is defined differently by many scientists. Arrhenius defined base as a substance that can donate hydroxide ions (OH) to the respective solution. Lowry Bronsted defined the base as a compound that can accept protons. Lewis also defined the base as an electron donor. According to the concept of Arrhenius base should have hydroxide ions to donate. Lowry Bronsted and Lewis said that those compounds could also act as a base that doesn’t possess hydroxide ions to donate.

As well as sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) is said as a Lowry Bronsted base because it doesn’t possess any hydroxide ion, but it has the ability to accept protons. Properties of the base include they are slippery in texture with soap like feeling; they are bitter in taste; they can easily react with the aids and in results produce salt and water molecule, they can change the color of the indicator. Baking soda, lye, sodium bicarbonate is some best examples of the base.

Bases are categorized into two different groups according to their ability of dissociation and production of OH ions i.e., weak bases and strong e only a few bases. Sodium hydroxide, Potassium hydroxide, is known as strong bases that can completely ionize in the respective solution. Ammonia is said to be a weak base that can partially dissociate in the respective solution and produce only a few OH ions. Furthermore, Kb is the constant of base concentration used as a parameter to check the ability of loses OH ions to categorize the base.

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