Stem vs. Branch

Stem vs. Branch — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Stem and Branch

Stemnoun

The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.

Branchnoun

The woody part of a tree arising from the trunk and usually dividing.

Stemnoun

A branch of a family.

Branchnoun

Any of the parts of something that divides like the branch of a tree.

the branch of an antler, a chandelier, or a railway

Stemnoun

An advanced or leading position; the lookout.

Branchnoun

A creek or stream which flows into a larger river. compare Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia run, and New York and New England brook.

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Stemnoun

(botany) The above-ground stalk (technically axis) of a vascular plant, and certain anatomically similar, below-ground organs such as rhizomes, bulbs, tubers, and corms.

Branchnoun

(geometry) One of the portions of a curve that extends outwards to an indefinitely great distance.

the branches of a hyperbola

Stemnoun

A slender supporting member of an individual part of a plant such as a flower or a leaf; also, by analogy, the shaft of a feather.

the stem of an apple or a cherry

Branchnoun

A location of an organization with several locations.

Our main branch is downtown, and we have branches in all major suburbs.

Stemnoun

A narrow part on certain man-made objects, such as a wine glass, a tobacco pipe, a spoon.

Branchnoun

A line of family descent, in distinction from some other line or lines from the same stock; any descendant in such a line.

the English branch of a family
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Stemnoun

(linguistics) The main part of an uninflected word to which affixes may be added to form inflections of the word. A stem often has a more fundamental root. Systematic conjugations and declensions derive from their stems.

Branchnoun

(Mormonism) A local congregation of the LDS Church that is not large enough to form a ward; see Wikipedia article on ward in LDS church.

Stemnoun

(slang) A person's leg.

Branchnoun

An area in business or of knowledge, research.

Stemnoun

(slang) The penis.

Branchnoun

(nautical) A certificate given by Trinity House to a pilot qualified to take navigational control of a ship in British waters.

Stemnoun

(typography) A vertical stroke of a letter.

Branchnoun

(computer architecture) A sequence of code that is conditionally executed.

Stemnoun

(music) A vertical stroke marking the length of a note in written music.

Branchnoun

(computing) A group of related files in a source control system, including for example source code, build scripts, and media such as images.

Stemnoun

(nautical) The vertical or nearly vertical forward extension of the keel, to which the forward ends of the planks or strakes are attached.

Branchnoun

(rail transport) A branch line.

Stemnoun

Component on a bicycle that connects the handlebars to the bicycle fork

Branchverb

(intransitive) To arise from the trunk or a larger branch of a tree.

Stemnoun

(anatomy) A part of an anatomic structure considered without its possible branches or ramifications.

Branchverb

(intransitive) To produce branches.

Stemnoun

(slang) A crack pipe; or the long, hollow portion of a similar pipe (i.e. meth pipe) resembling a crack pipe.

Branchverb

(ambitransitive) To (cause to) divide into separate parts or subdivisions.

Stemnoun

(chiefly British) A winder on a clock, watch, or similar mechanism

Branchverb

To jump to a different location in a program, especially as the result of a conditional statement.

Stemnoun

alternative form of STEM

Branchnoun

an administrative division of some larger or more complex organization;

a branch of Congress

Stemverb

To remove the stem from.

to stem cherries; to stem tobacco leaves

Branchnoun

a division of a stem, or secondary stem arising from the main stem of a plant

Stemverb

To be caused or derived; to originate.

The current crisis stems from the short-sighted politics of the previous government.

Branchnoun

a part of a forked or branching shape;

he broke off one of the branchesthey took the south fork

Stemverb

To descend in a family line.

Branchnoun

a natural consequence of development

Stemverb

To direct the stem (of a ship) against; to make headway against.

Branchnoun

a stream or river connected to a larger one

Stemverb

(obsolete) To hit with the stem of a ship; to ram.

Branchnoun

any projection that is thought to resemble an arm;

the arm of the record playeran arm of the seaa branch of the sewer

Stemverb

To ram (clay, etc.) into a blasting hole.

Branchverb

grow and send out branches or branch-like structures;

these plants ramify early and get to be very large

Stemverb

(transitive) To stop, hinder (for instance, a river or blood).

to stem a tide

Branchverb

divide into two or more branches so as to form a fork;

The road forks

Stemverb

(skiing) To move the feet apart and point the tips of the skis inward in order to slow down the speed or to facilitate a turn.

Stemnoun

(linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed;

thematic vowels are part of the stem

Stemnoun

a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ

Stemnoun

cylinder forming a long narrow part of something

Stemnoun

the tube of a tobacco pipe

Stemnoun

front part of a vessel or aircraft;

he pointed the bow of the boat toward the finish line

Stemnoun

a turn made in skiing; the back of one ski is forced outward and the other ski is brought parallel to it

Stemverb

grow out of, have roots in, originate in;

The increase in the national debt stems from the last war

Stemverb

cause to point inward;

stem your skis

Stemverb

stop the flow of a liquid;

staunch the blood flowthem the tide

Stemverb

remove the stem from;

for automatic natural language processing, the words must be stemmed