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Stem vs. Branch: What's the Difference?

Stem and Branch Definitions

Stem

The main ascending part of a plant; a stalk or trunk.

Branch

A secondary woody stem or limb growing from the trunk or main stem of a tree or shrub or from another secondary limb.

Stem

A slender stalk supporting or connecting another plant part, such as a leaf or flower.

Branch

A lateral division or subdivision of certain other plant parts, such as a root or flower cluster.

Stem

A banana stalk bearing several bunches of bananas.
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Branch

A secondary outgrowth or subdivision of a main axis, such as the tine of a deer's antlers.

Stem

The tube of a tobacco pipe.

Branch

(Anatomy) An offshoot or a division of the main portion of a structure, especially that of a nerve, blood vessel, or lymphatic vessel; a ramus.

Stem

The slender upright support of a wineglass or goblet.

Branch

An area of specialized skill or knowledge, especially academic or vocational, that is related to but separate from other areas
The judicial branch of government.
The branch of medicine called neurology.
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Stem

The small projecting shaft with an expanded crown by which a watch is wound.

Branch

A division of a business or other organization.

Stem

The rounded rod in the center of certain locks about which the key fits and is turned.

Branch

A division of a family, categorized by descent from a particular ancestor.

Stem

The shaft of a feather or hair.

Branch

(Linguistics) A subdivision of a family of languages, such as the Germanic branch of Indo-European.

Stem

The upright stroke of a typeface or letter.

Branch

A tributary of a river.

Stem

(Music) The vertical line extending from the head of a note.

Branch

Chiefly Southern US See creek. See Note at run.

Stem

The main line of descent of a family.

Branch

A divergent section of a river, especially near the mouth.

Stem

(Linguistics) The main part of a word to which affixes are added.

Branch

(Mathematics) A part of a curve that is separated, as by discontinuities or extreme points.

Stem

(Nautical) The curved upright beam at the fore of a vessel into which the hull timbers are scarfed to form the prow.

Branch

A sequence of program instructions to which the normal sequence of instructions relinquishes control, depending on the value of certain variables.

Stem

The tubular glass structure mounting the filament or electrodes in an incandescent bulb or vacuum tube.

Branch

The instructions executed as the result of such a passing of control.

Stem

To have or take origin or descent
Her success stems mostly from hard work.

Branch

(Chemistry) A bifurcation in a linear chain of atoms, especially in an organic molecule where isomeric hydrocarbon groups can vary in the location and number of these bifurcations of the carbon chain.

Stem

To remove the stem of
Stemmed the apples.

Branch

To put forth a branch or branches; spread by dividing.

Stem

To provide with a stem
Wine glasses that are stemmed.

Branch

To come forth as a branch or subdivision; develop or diverge from
An unpaved road that branches from the main road.
A theory that branches from an older system of ideas.

Stem

To make headway against (a tide or current, for example).

Branch

(Computers) To relinquish control to another set of instructions or another routine as a result of the presence of a branch.

Stem

To stop or stanch (a flow)
Stemmed the bleeding.

Branch

To separate (something) into branches.

Stem

To restrain or stop
Wanted to stem the growth of government.

Branch

To embroider (something) with a design of foliage or flowers.

Stem

To plug or tamp (a blast hole, for example).

Branch

The woody part of a tree arising from the trunk and usually dividing.

Stem

(Sports) To turn (a ski, usually the uphill ski) by moving the heel outward.

Branch

Any of the parts of something that divides like the branch of a tree.
The branch of an antler, a chandelier, or a railway

Stem

To stem a ski or both skis, as in making a turn.

Branch

A creek or stream which flows into a larger river.
Branch water

Stem

The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.

Branch

(geometry) One of the portions of a curve that extends outwards to an indefinitely great distance.
The branches of a hyperbola

Stem

A branch of a family.

Branch

A location of an organization with several locations.
Our main branch is downtown, and we have branches in all major suburbs.

Stem

An advanced or leading position; the lookout.

Branch

A line of family descent, in distinction from some other line or lines from the same stock; any descendant in such a line.
The English branch of a family

Stem

(botany) The above-ground stalk (technically axis) of a vascular plant, and certain anatomically similar, below-ground organs such as rhizomes, bulbs, tubers, and corms.

Branch

(Mormonism) A local congregation of the LDS Church that is not large enough to form a ward; see Wikipedia article on ward in LDS church.

Stem

A slender supporting member of an individual part of a plant such as a flower or a leaf; also, by analogy, the shaft of a feather.
The stem of an apple or a cherry

Branch

An area in business or of knowledge, research.

Stem

A narrow part on certain man-made objects, such as a wine glass, a tobacco pipe, a spoon.

Branch

(nautical) A certificate given by Trinity House to a pilot qualified to take navigational control of a ship in British waters.

Stem

(linguistics) The main part of an uninflected word to which affixes may be added to form inflections of the word. A stem often has a more fundamental root. Systematic conjugations and declensions derive from their stems.

Branch

(computing) A sequence of code that is conditionally executed.

Stem

(slang) A person's leg.

Branch

(computing) A group of related files in a source control system, including for example source code, build scripts, and media such as images.

Stem

(slang) The penis.

Branch

(rail transport) A branch line.

Stem

(typography) A vertical stroke of a letter.

Branch

(intransitive) To arise from the trunk or a larger branch of a tree.

Stem

(music) A vertical stroke marking the length of a note in written music.

Branch

(intransitive) To produce branches.

Stem

(music) A premixed portion of a track for use in audio mastering and remixing.

Branch

(ambitransitive) To (cause to) divide into separate parts or subdivisions.

Stem

(nautical) The vertical or nearly vertical forward extension of the keel, to which the forward ends of the planks or strakes are attached.

Branch

To jump to a different location in a program, especially as the result of a conditional statement.

Stem

(cycling) A component on a bicycle that connects the handlebars to the bicycle fork.

Branch

(transitive) To strip of branches.

Stem

(anatomy) A part of an anatomic structure considered without its possible branches or ramifications.

Branch

To discipline (a union member) at a branch meeting.

Stem

(slang) A crack pipe; or the long, hollow portion of a similar pipe (i.e. meth pipe) resembling a crack pipe.

Branch

A shoot or secondary stem growing from the main stem, or from a principal limb or bough of a tree or other plant.

Stem

A winder on a clock, watch, or similar mechanism.

Branch

Any division extending like a branch; any arm or part connected with the main body of thing; ramification; as, the branch of an antler; the branch of a chandelier; a branch of a river; a branch of a railway.
Most of the branches , or streams, were dried up.

Stem

Alternative form of STEM

Branch

Any member or part of a body or system; a distinct article; a section or subdivision; a department.
It is a branch and parcel of mine oath.

Stem

A lesbian, chiefly African-American, exhibiting both stud and femme traits.

Branch

One of the portions of a curve that extends outwards to an indefinitely great distance; as, the branches of an hyperbola.

Stem

To remove the stem from.
To stem cherries; to stem tobacco leaves

Branch

A line of family descent, in distinction from some other line or lines from the same stock; any descendant in such a line; as, the English branch of a family.
His father, a younger branch of the ancient stock.

Stem

To be caused or derived; to originate.
The current crisis stems from the short-sighted politics of the previous government.

Branch

A warrant or commission given to a pilot, authorizing him to pilot vessels in certain waters.

Stem

To descend in a family line.

Branch

Diverging from, or tributary to, a main stock, line, way, theme, etc.; as, a branch vein; a branch road or line; a branch topic; a branch store.

Stem

To direct the stem (of a ship) against; to make headway against.

Branch

To shoot or spread in branches; to separate into branches; to ramify.

Stem

(obsolete) To hit with the stem of a ship; to ram.

Branch

To divide into separate parts or subdivision.
To branch out into a long disputation.

Stem

To ram (clay, etc.) into a blasting hole.

Branch

To divide as into branches; to make subordinate division in.

Stem

(transitive) To stop, hinder (for instance, a river or blood).
To stem a tide

Branch

To adorn with needlework representing branches, flowers, or twigs.
The train whereof loose far behind her strayed,Branched with gold and pearl, most richly wrought.

Stem

(skiing) To move the feet apart and point the tips of the skis inward in order to slow down the speed or to facilitate a turn.

Branch

An administrative division of some larger or more complex organization;
A branch of Congress

Stem

To gleam.
His head bald, that shone as any glass, . . . [And] stemed as a furnace of a leed [caldron].

Branch

A division of a stem, or secondary stem arising from the main stem of a plant

Stem

To remove the stem or stems from; as, to stem cherries; to remove the stem and its appendages (ribs and veins) from; as, to stem tobacco leaves.

Branch

A part of a forked or branching shape;
He broke off one of the branches
They took the south fork

Stem

To ram, as clay, into a blasting hole.

Branch

A natural consequence of development

Stem

To oppose or cut with, or as with, the stem of a vessel; to resist, or make progress against; to stop or check the flow of, as a current.
[They] stem the flood with their erected breasts.
Stemmed the wild torrent of a barbarous age.

Branch

A stream or river connected to a larger one

Stem

To move forward against an obstacle, as a vessel against a current.
Stemming nightly toward the pole.

Branch

Any projection that is thought to resemble an arm;
The arm of the record player
An arm of the sea
A branch of the sewer

Stem

A gleam of light; flame.

Branch

Grow and send out branches or branch-like structures;
These plants ramify early and get to be very large

Stem

The principal body of a tree, shrub, or plant, of any kind; the main stock; the part which supports the branches or the head or top.
After they are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough nor twig in the trunk or the stem.
The lowering spring, with lavish rain,Beats down the slender stem and breaded grain.

Branch

Divide into two or more branches so as to form a fork;
The road forks

Stem

A little branch which connects a fruit, flower, or leaf with a main branch; a peduncle, pedicel, or petiole; as, the stem of an apple or a cherry.

Stem

The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.
While I do pray, learn here thy stemAnd true descent.

Stem

A branch of a family.
This is a stemOf that victorious stock.

Stem

A curved piece of timber to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. The lower end of it is scarfed to the keel, and the bowsprit rests upon its upper end. Hence, the forward part of a vessel; the bow.

Stem

Fig.: An advanced or leading position; the lookout.
Wolsey sat at the stem more than twenty years.

Stem

Anything resembling a stem or stalk; as, the stem of a tobacco pipe; the stem of a watch case, or that part to which the ring, by which it is suspended, is attached.

Stem

That part of a plant which bears leaves, or rudiments of leaves, whether rising above ground or wholly subterranean.

Stem

The entire central axis of a feather.

Stem

The short perpendicular line added to the body of a note; the tail of a crotchet, quaver, semiquaver, etc.

Stem

The part of an inflected word which remains unchanged (except by euphonic variations) throughout a given inflection; theme; base.

Stem

(linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed;
Thematic vowels are part of the stem

Stem

A slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ

Stem

Cylinder forming a long narrow part of something

Stem

The tube of a tobacco pipe

Stem

Front part of a vessel or aircraft;
He pointed the bow of the boat toward the finish line

Stem

A turn made in skiing; the back of one ski is forced outward and the other ski is brought parallel to it

Stem

Grow out of, have roots in, originate in;
The increase in the national debt stems from the last war

Stem

Cause to point inward;
Stem your skis

Stem

Stop the flow of a liquid;
Staunch the blood flow
Them the tide

Stem

Remove the stem from;
For automatic natural language processing, the words must be stemmed

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