Railway vs. Railroad

Main Difference

Railway and railroad are two different words but with the same terminology and used in context with same meaning. The difference lies in just the words. They both are the same. The only difference is that of the British and American English language. If a person lives in United Kingdom or the adjoining commonwealth countries that person will call it a railway. A railway is a term that means a system of different rails and trains which includes all the different tracks and the infrastructure associated with it and all the locomotives with engines and different coaches to carry passengers from one destination to another or to carry cargo from place to another. This is the general meaning of the word railway. But, if you are live in the United States the same term railway with the same meaning becomes the tem railroad. It’s just the difference of language. However if we see both the terms railways and railroads in a broader context and research about in history, we will get to know that in united States trains were used to travel to everyday destinations and thus the tracks or rails were made on roads, hence the name railroads used commonly in the United States. Usually rails are usually constructed away from the city for longer destinations and for the trains to travel fast and without interruption of the traffic or signals, so mostly the name used in almost all countries in railways. Another interesting fact is that railways is a name reserved for trams or streetcars in the United States but it is not commonly used. The basic meaning of both the words is same; it is a track in which trains run. To differentiate further, a railroad is a permanent road consisting of parallel tracks to transport passengers for shorter distance within the city while a railway is a whole track in which trains carry passengers and cargo for longer distances at a faster speed.

Railway vs. Railroad — Is There a Difference?
ADVERTISEMENT

Difference Between Railway and Railroad

Railway vs. Railroad

The major difference is just in the words, railways have ways in it while railroads have roads in it.

Railway vs. Railroad

The difference is in the language, in the United Kingdom and the adjoining commonwealth countries the term is known as railways while in the United States it is known as the railroads.

Railway vs. Railroad

Railways is a broad term which means all the rails, tracks and infrastructure associated with it while railroads means a different set of roads in which trains travel.

Railway vs. Railroad

Railways are for a longer distance while railroads can also be used for a shorter distance.

Railway vs. Railroad

Railways are situated far from the city while railroads are also constructed within the city.

Railway vs. Railroad

Railways carry a large number of passengers and cargo while railroads can carry a small number of passengers to transport them to their destination.

ADVERTISEMENT

Railwaynoun

A transport system using rails used to move passengers or goods.

Railroadnoun

A permanent road consisting of fixed metal rails to drive trains or similar motorized vehicles on.

Many railroads roughly follow the trace of older land - and/or water roads

Railwaynoun

A track, consisting of parallel rails, over which wheeled vehicles such as trains may travel.

Railroadnoun

The transportation system comprising such roads and vehicles fitted to travel on the rails, usually with several vehicles connected together in a train.

Railwaynoun

line that is the commercial organization responsible for operating a railway system

Railroadnoun

A single, privately or publicly owned property comprising one or more such roads and usually associated assets

Railroads can only compete fully if their tracks are technically compatible with and linked to each-other
ADVERTISEMENT

Railwaynoun

a line of track providing a runway for wheels;

he walked along the railroad track

Railroadnoun

(figuratively) A procedure conducted in haste without due consideration.

The lawyers made the procedure a railroad to get the signatures they needed.

Railroadverb

(transitive) To transport via railroad.

Railroadverb

(intransitive) To operate a railroad.

The Thatcherite experiment proved the private sector can railroad as inefficiently as a state monopoly

Railroadverb

(intransitive) To work for a railroad.

Railroadverb

(intransitive) To travel by railroad.

Railroadverb

(intransitive) To engage in a hobby pertaining to railroads.

Railroadverb

(transitive) To manipulate and hasten a procedure, as of formal approval of a law or resolution.

The majority railroaded the bill through parliament, without the customary expert studies which would delay it till after the elections.

Railroadverb

(transitive) To convict of a crime by circumventing due process.

They could only convict him by railroading him on suspect drug-possession charges.

Railroadverb

(transitive) To procedurally bully someone into an unfair agreement.

He was railroaded into signing a non-disclosure agreement at his exit interview.

Railroadverb

(role-playing games) To force characters to complete a task before allowing the plot to continue.

Railroadverb

(upholstery) To run fabric horizontally instead of the usual vertically.

Railroadnoun

line that is the commercial organization responsible for operating a railway system

Railroadnoun

a line of track providing a runway for wheels;

he walked along the railroad track

Railroadverb

compel by coercion, threats, or crude means;

They sandbagged him to make dinner for everyone

Railroadverb

supply with railroad lines;

railroad the West

Railroadverb

transport by railroad

Comparison Chart

RailwayRailroad
Railways have ways in itRailroad has roads in it
Location Difference
In the United Kingdom and the adjoining commonwealth countries the term is known as railwaysIn the United States it is known as the railroads
Broader Meaning
A broad term which means all the rails, tracks and infrastructure associated with itA different set of roads in which trains travel.
Distance
LongerShorter

Definition of Railway

A railway is a huge track of different rails in which trains travel to carry a large number of passengers and cargo for longer distance like from one city to another at a very fast speed. A railway is the whole infrastructure of all the tracks, rails and trains associated together. A railway is usually built away from the city for convenience and easy travel for ten passengers without the hassle of signals and traffics and the trains travel in it with a jiffy without stopping before the destination. A railway refers to it all in the British English. A person residing in the United Kingdom and the adjoining commonwealth countries will call it a railway. In old times small coaches or vehicles that used to carry passengers which were used for travel on the streets with small road tracks were also called railways. Railway is an international terminology which is used by most of the countries of the world.

Definition of Railroad

Railroad is the synonym of the word railway. The only difference is that in the United States railways are known as railroads and are named only this exclusively. Before the 1850, railroad was the name used in the United Kingdom and was written as rail road instead of railroad but then the railways started to become popular all around the world the use of the word rail road was discontinued and people began to use railways as the more preferred term apart from United States which uses the word Railroad exclusively. A railroad is a permanent road which is used to carry and transport the passengers within the city for shorter distances.

Conclusion

Trains are one of the most common and fastest modes of traveling around the world but there are various terms associated with it which can get confusing. All in all, this article has looked at the main differences between railway and railroad so that people know how they differ and how are they related.