Order vs. Molecularity

Main Difference

The difference between Order and Molecularity is that the Order of a reaction is the algebraic sum of the powers to which the concentration of atoms is raised in a reaction, whereas Molecularity is the number of reactants taking part in an elementary reaction that is indicted by its chemical equation.

Order vs. Molecularity — Is There a Difference?
ADVERTISEMENT

Difference Between Order and Molecularity

Order vs. Molecularity

Order of a reaction is the algebraic sum of the powers for the concentration of atoms in a reaction, whereas molecularity is just the number of reactants taking part in a chemical reaction.

Order vs. Molecularity

Zero-order, first-order, and second-order reactions are classified based on order; however, based on molecularity, there are unimolecular reactions, bimolecular reactions, and trimolecular reactions.

Order vs. Molecularity

Order of a reaction reduces as if a single reactant is found in excess in a reaction, while on the other hand, in case of molecularity, there is no such dependency on reactants.

Order vs. Molecularity

The order of a reaction is generally 1, 2, or 3 or can be zero or infraction or negative, but on the other hand, the Molecularity of a reaction can always be in a natural number.

Order vs. Molecularity

The rate order of a reaction can only be determined by experimenting, whereas, the molecularity of a reaction can be predicted based on its balancing equation.

Order vs. Molecularity

The order of a reaction may vary whenever a reaction is subjected under changing pressure, temperature and concentration, etc., contrary to this, as molecularity is just several reactants that are taking part in a chemical reaction and are not affected by the external environment conditions.

ADVERTISEMENT

Order vs. Molecularity

There is no rate-determining step, and the overall reaction is used to calculate the order of a reaction; however, the rate-determining step is used to obtain the molecularity.

Order vs. Molecularity

Order of a reaction applies to simple and complex reactions or reactions that are completed in multi-steps both, whereas, molecularity is calculated for simple reactions only.

Ordernoun

(countable) Arrangement, disposition, or sequence.

Molecularitynoun

(uncountable) The state of being molecular

Ordernoun

(countable) A position in an arrangement, disposition, or sequence.

Molecularitynoun

(chemistry) (of a reaction) The number or molecules that react directly with one another

ADVERTISEMENT

Ordernoun

(uncountable) The state of being well arranged.

The house is in order; the machinery is out of order.

Ordernoun

(countable) Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet.

to preserve order in a community or an assembly

Ordernoun

(countable) A command.

Ordernoun

(countable) A request for some product or service; a commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods.

Ordernoun

(countable) A group of religious adherents, especially monks or nuns, set apart within their religion by adherence to a particular rule or set of principles

St. Ignatius Loyola founded the Jesuit order in 1537.

Ordernoun

(countable) An association of knights

the Order of the Garter, the Order of the Bath.

Ordernoun

any group of people with common interests.

Ordernoun

(countable) A decoration, awarded by a government, a dynastic house, or a religious body to an individual, usually for distinguished service to a nation or to humanity.

Ordernoun

A rank in the classification of organisms, below class and above family; a taxon at that rank.

Magnolias belong to the order Magnoliales.

Ordernoun

A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a distinct character, kind, or sort.

the higher or lower orders of societytalent of a high order

Ordernoun

An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; often used in the plural.

to take orders, or to take holy orders, that is, to enter some grade of the ministry

Ordernoun

(architecture) The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing.

Ordernoun

(cricket) The sequence in which a side’s batsmen bat; the batting order.

Ordernoun

(electronics) a power of polynomial function in an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.

a 3-stage cascade of a 2nd-order bandpass Butterworth filter.

Ordernoun

(chemistry) The overall power of the rate law of a chemical reaction, expressed as a polynomial function of concentrations of reactants and products.

Ordernoun

(set theory) The cardinality, or number of elements in a set, group, or other structure regardable as a set.

Ordernoun

For given group G and element g ∈ G, the smallest positive natural number n, if it exists, such that (using multiplicative notation), gn = e, where e is the identity element of G; if no such number exists, the element is said to be of infinite order (or sometimes zero order).

Ordernoun

(graph theory) The number of vertices in a graph.

Ordernoun

(order theory) A partially ordered set.

Ordernoun

(order theory) The relation on a partially ordered set that determines that it is, in fact, a partially ordered set.

Ordernoun

(algebra) The sum of the exponents on the variables in a monomial, or the highest such among all monomials in a polynomial.

A quadratic polynomial, a x^2 + b x +c, is said to be of order (or degree) 2.

Orderverb

(transitive) To set in some sort of order.

Orderverb

(transitive) To arrange, set in proper order.

Orderverb

(transitive) To issue a command to.

to order troops to advanceHe ordered me to leave.

Orderverb

(transitive) To request some product or service; to secure by placing an order.

to order groceries

Orderverb

To admit to holy orders; to ordain; to receive into the ranks of the ministry.

Ordernoun

(often plural) a command given by a superior (e.g., a military or law enforcement officer) that must be obeyed;

the British ships dropped anchor and waited for orders from London

Ordernoun

a degree in a continuum of size or quantity;

it was on the order of a milean explosion of a low order of magnitude

Ordernoun

established customary state (especially of society);

order ruled in the streetslaw and order

Ordernoun

logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements;

we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation

Ordernoun

a condition of regular or proper arrangement;

he put his desk in orderthe machine is now in working order

Ordernoun

a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge);

a friend in New Mexico said that the order caused no trouble out there

Ordernoun

a commercial document used to request someone to supply something in return for payment and providing specifications and quantities;

IBM received an order for a hundred computers

Ordernoun

a formal association of people with similar interests;

he joined a golf clubthey formed a small lunch societymen from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today

Ordernoun

a body of rules followed by an assembly

Ordernoun

(usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy;

theologians still disagree over whether `bishop' should or should not be a separate order

Ordernoun

a group of person living under a religious rule;

the order of Saint Benedict

Ordernoun

(biology) taxonomic group containing one or more families

Ordernoun

a request for food or refreshment (as served in a restaurant or bar etc.);

I gave the waiter my order

Ordernoun

(architecture) one of original three styles of Greek architecture distinguished by the type of column and entablature used or a style developed from the original three by the Romans

Ordernoun

putting in order;

there were mistakes in the ordering of items on the list

Orderverb

give instructions to or direct somebody to do something with authority;

I said to him to go homeShe ordered him to do the shoppingThe mother told the child to get dressed

Orderverb

make a request for something;

Order me some flowersorder a work stoppage

Orderverb

issue commands or orders for

Orderverb

bring into conformity with rules or principles or usage; impose regulations;

We cannot regulate the way people dressThis town likes to regulate

Orderverb

bring order to or into;

Order these files

Orderverb

place in a certain order;

order these files

Orderverb

appoint to a clerical posts;

he was ordained in the Church

Orderverb

arrange thoughts, ideas, temporal events, etc.;

arrange my scheduleset up one's lifeI put these memories with those of bygone times

Orderverb

assign a rank or rating to;

how would you rank these students?The restaurant is rated highly in the food guide

Comparison Chart

OrderMolecularity
The algebraic sum of the powers to which the concentration of atoms is raised in a reactionThe number of reactants taking part in a chemical reaction
Determination
Can only be determined by experimentingNo complicated experimentation is required
Dependence
Order of a reaction reduces if a single reactant is in excessMolecularity does not depend on the excessiveness of a reactant.
Value
Order of a reaction is generally 1, 2 or 3 or maybe zero or in fraction or negativeMolecularity of a reaction can always be in a natural number
Rate Determining Step
No rate-determining step and the overall reaction is used to calculate the order of a reactionThe rate-determining step is used to obtain the molecularity
Effect of the External Environment
The order of a reaction may vary whenever a reaction is subjected to changing pressure, temperature, and concentration, etc.Molecularity of a reaction is invariant to these changes in the atmosphere.
Classification of Reactions
Reactions are classified based on their order as · Zero-Order Reaction · 1st Order Reaction · 2nd Order ReactionReactions are classified based on their molecularity as · Unimolecular Reaction · Bimolecular Reaction · Trimolecular Reaction
Application
Order of a reaction applies to a simple and elementary reactionMolecularity is calculated for simple reactions only there is no sign of calculating molecularity of a complex reaction

Order vs. Molecularity

Order of a reaction is the algebraic sum of the powers to which the concentration of atoms is raised in a reaction, while on the other hand, molecularity is the number of reactants taking part in a chemical reaction that is indicted by its chemical equation. Order of a reaction reduces a single reactant is in excess in a reaction, while on the other hand, in case of molecularity, there is no such dependency on reactants.

The order of a reaction is generally 1, 2, or 3 or maybe zero or in a fraction or negative, but on the flip side, the molecularity of a reaction can always be in a natural number. Order of a reaction can only be determined by experimenting and cannot be predicted based on the balanced chemical equation, whereas the molecularity of a reaction can easily be predicted based on its balancing equation, and no complicated experimentation is required.

The order of a reaction may vary whenever a reaction is subjected under changing pressure, temperature, and concentration, etc., contrary to this, as molecularity, is just several reactants that are taking part in a chemical reaction which makes it irrelevant to these changes in the atmosphere and makes it invariant. For calculating the order of a reaction, there is no rate-determining step, and the overall reaction is used to calculate the order of a reaction; however, the rate-determining step is used to obtain the molecularity, and the overall reaction is not required.

There are Zero-order, first-order, and second-order reactions that are classified based on order; however, based on molecularity, there are unimolecular reactions, bimolecular reactions, and trimolecular reactions. Order of a reaction applies to simple and elementary reactions both, whereas, molecularity is calculated for simple reactions only, there is no sign of calculating the molecularity of a complex reaction.

What is Order?

The rate order of a reaction is defined as the algebraic sum of the powers to which the concentration of atoms is raised in a reaction. It is also referred to as the power dependence of the rate of each reactant during the reaction. It is the sum of exponents of the rate law derived, and it may not depend on the stoichiometric coefficients of each reactant. Due to this reason, the rate of law is determined experimentally.

It is a quantitative measure regarding the rate of a reaction. The rate law is the equation raised. The order of a reaction is generally 1, 2, or 3 or maybe zero or in fraction or negative. The rate order of a reaction can only be resolute by experimenting and usually cannot be expected based on the balanced chemical equation. In an example like X + Y + Z → A + B + C, the rate law will be concluded as R = k [X] p [Y] q [Z] r .

Where R is the short form for the rate of reaction, X, Y, and Z are reactants, p, q, and r are orders of the reaction for X, Y, and Z. K here is considered as proportionality constant, and it mirrors the character of the reaction. Chemists discuss the sum of p, q, and r as the kinetic direction of the reaction. The order of these values is calculated experimentally.

The order of this reaction will be calculated by considering the overall reaction, unlike in molecularity, where rate-determining steps determine the molecularity. There are several types of reactions based on their order. There are Zero-order reactions in which the rate of a reaction does not rest on the concentration of reactants. First-order reactions are those who are reliant on the deliberation of reactants and correspond to a uni-molecular reaction. A one-second order reactant or two first order reactants are the second-order reactions that may hang on the deliberation of these two orders.

The order of a reaction may vary whenever a reaction is subjected to changing pressure, temperature, and concentration, etc. For calculating the order of a reaction, there is no rate-determining step, and the overall reaction is used to calculate the order of a reaction, and the order of a reaction applies to simple and elementary reactions both.

What is Molecularity?

Molecularity is the number of reactants participating in a chemical reaction that is indicted by its chemical equation. In the case of Molecularity, there is no dependency on the excessiveness of reactants as it was in the order of reactions. Molecularity of a reaction can always be in a natural number as it is the number of reactants in a particular reaction.

Molecularity of a reaction can easily be predicted based on its balancing equation, and no complicated experimentation is required. It does not depend upon the external environment as it is just a quantity of reactants that are taking part in a chemical reaction, which makes it irrelevant to these changes in the atmosphere and makes it invariant. The rate-determining step is used to obtain the molecularity, and the overall reaction is not required.

Based on molecularity, there are unimolecular reactions, bimolecular reactions, and trimolecular reactions. In unimolecular reactions, a single molecule undergoes amendments while reaction proceeds, and it has only one reactant and a single rate-determining step. In bimolecular reactions, two reactants are involved and are completing the reaction. However, in trimolecular reactions, three reactants are involved in the rate-determining step. Molecularity is just calculated for simple reactions; only there is no sign of calculating the molecularity of a complex or multi-step reaction.

Conclusion

Order of a reaction is the algebraic sum of the powers to which the concentration of atoms is raised in a reaction that can be in fraction or negative number, whereas, molecularity is the number of reactants taking part in an elementary reaction and are in neutral number.