Meet vs. Met

Main Difference

The word meet gets the definition of an arrangement or action that results in two or more people coming into the presence of each other or meet somewhere. On the other hand, Met becomes the past and past participle of the term competition and used to describe interacting with someone sometime before the current events.

Meet vs. Met — Is There a Difference?
ADVERTISEMENT

Difference Between Meet and Met

Meet vs. Met

The word meet gets the definition of an arrangement or action that results in two or more people coming into the presence of each other or meet somewhere. On the other hand, Met became the past and past participle of the term competition and used to describe interacting with someone sometime before the current events.

Meet vs. Met

The term meet originated from Old English mētan ‘come upon,' of Germanic origin; related to Dutch moeten, also to moot. On the flipside, the term met also has the same origin becomes they maintain the same root.

Meet vs. Met

Both these words get used as verbs, where the difference arises only when the context comes into contention. Meet gets used as a verb whenever an action that shows happening in the current scenario whereas met shows relation to the past.

Meet vs. Met

Sentence example of meet becomes; “When he appeared at the door she grew flurried, evidently undecided whether to go to meet him or to wait till he came up.” On the other hand, the sentence example of met becomes; “I had met people so empty of joy, that when I clasped their frosty fingertips, it seemed as if I were shaking hands with a northeast storm.”

Meetverb

Of individuals: to make personal contact.

Metverb

(obsolete) To dream.

ADVERTISEMENT

Meetverb

To come face to face with by accident; to encounter.

Fancy meeting you here!Guess who I met at the supermarket today?

Meetverb

To come face to face with someone by arrangement.

Let's meet at the station at 9 o'clock.Shall we meet at 8 p.m in our favorite chatroom?

Meetverb

To get acquainted with someone.

I'm pleased to meet you!I'd like you to meet a colleague of mine.I met my husband through a mutual friend at a party. It wasn't love at first sight; in fact, we couldn't stand each other at first!

Meetverb

(Ireland) To French kiss someone.

Meetverb

Of groups: to gather or oppose.

Meetverb

To gather for a formal or social discussion.

I met with them several times.The government ministers met today to start the negotiations.
ADVERTISEMENT

Meetverb

To come together in conflict.

Meetverb

(sports) To play a match.

England and Holland will meet in the final.

Meetverb

To make physical or perceptual contact.

Meetverb

To converge and finally touch or intersect.

The two streets meet at a crossroad half a mile away.

Meetverb

To touch or hit something while moving.

The right wing of the car met the column in the garage, leaving a dent.

Meetverb

To adjoin, be physically touching.

The carpet meets the wall at this side of the room.The forest meets the sea along this part of the coast.

Meetverb

To satisfy; to comply with.

This proposal meets my requirements.The company agrees to meet the cost of any repairs.

Meetverb

To perceive; to come to a knowledge of; to have personal acquaintance with; to experience; to suffer.

The eye met a horrid sight.He met his fate.

Meetnoun

A sports competition, especially for track and field or swimming (a swim meet).

Meetnoun

A gathering of riders, horses and hounds for foxhunting; a field meet for hunting.

Meetnoun

(rail transport) A meeting of two trains in opposite directions on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other cross.

Meetnoun

A meeting.

OK, let's arrange a meet with Tyler and ask him.

Meetnoun

(algebra) The greatest lower bound, an operation between pairs of elements in a lattice, denoted by the symbol ∧.

Meetnoun

(Irish) An act of French kissing someone.

Meetadjective

(archaic) Suitable; right; proper.

Meetnoun

a meeting at which a number of athletic contests are held

Meetverb

come together;

I'll probably see you at the meetingHow nice to see you again!

Meetverb

get together socially or for a specific purpose

Meetverb

be adjacent or come together;

The lines converge at this point

Meetverb

fill or meet a want or need

Meetverb

satisfy a condition or restriction;

Does this paper meet the requirements for the degree?

Meetverb

satisfy or fulfill;

meet a needthis job doesn't match my dreams

Meetverb

get to know; get acquainted with;

I met this really handsome guy at a bar last night!we met in Singapore

Meetverb

collect in one place;

We assembled in the church basementLet's gather in the dining room

Meetverb

meet by design; be present at the arrival of;

Can you meet me at the train station?

Meetverb

contend against an opponent in a sport, game, or battle;

Princeton plays Yale this weekendCharlie likes to play Mary

Meetverb

experience as a reaction;

My proposal met with much opposition

Meetverb

undergo or suffer;

meet a violent deathsuffer a terrible fate

Meetverb

be in direct physical contact with; make contact;

The two buildings touchTheir hands touchedThe wire must not contact the metal coverThe surfaces contact at this point

Meetadjective

being precisely fitting and right;

it is only meet that she should be seated first

Comparison Chart

MeetMet
An arrangement or action that results in two or more people coming into the presence of each other or meet somewhere.The past and past participle of the term competition and used to describe interacting with someone sometime before the current events.
Origin
Old English mētan ‘come upon,' of Germanic origin; related to Dutch moeten, also to moot.Same as Meet.
Example
“When he appeared at the door she grew flurried, evidently undecided whether to go to meet him or to wait till he came up.”“I had met people so empty of joy, that when I clasped their frosty fingertips, it seemed as if I were shaking hands with a northeast storm.”

What is Meet?

The word meet gets the definition of an arrangement or action that results in two or more people coming into the presence of each other or meet somewhere. Another way of looking at the term becomes the interaction between two bodies, which join and the connecting point has a meeting stature. A meeting is a social occasion of at least two individuals that has assembled with the end goal of accomplishing a shared objective through verbal cooperation, for example, sharing data or achieving understanding. Gatherings may happen eye to eye or, as interceded by correspondences innovation, for instance, a phone telephone call, a skyped phone call or a video conference. One can recognize a meeting from different social occasions, for instance, a shot experience, a games diversion or show; a verbal association is coincidental. A gathering or the organization of companions, no shared objective is to be accomplished and an exhibit whose common goal is achieved fundamentally through the quantity of demonstrator’s present, not through verbal collaboration. Formal or casual deliberative gathering of people called to face off regarding certain issues and problems, and to take choices. Formal gatherings held at unequivocal circumstances, at a conspicuous place, and as a rule for an actual length to take after a settled upon plan. In a corporate setting, they get partitioned into two principle gatherings (1) Organizational meeting: Typically, a customary meeting including stockholders (shareholders) and administration, for example, an executive meeting and large yearly meeting (AGM). (2) Operational meeting: general or impromptu meeting including management and representatives, for instance, a board of trustees meeting, arranging a meeting and deals meeting.

What is Met?

The word met almost has the same definition as the word meet with the only difference coming in the way it gets used. Met, therefore, becomes the past and past participle of the term competition and used to describe interacting with someone sometime before the current events. A one-time meeting is the most widely recognized meeting sort and covers occasions that are independent. While they may rehash frequently, the individual session is the sum of the opportunity. It can incorporate a 2006 gathering. The 2007 rendition of the collection is a remain separate meeting opportunity. A repeating meeting is a meeting that occasionally repeats, for example, each Monday staff meeting from 9:00 AM to 9:30 AM. The meeting coordinator needs the members to be at the meeting on a consistent and monotonous premise. A repeating meeting can be continuous, for example, a week after week group meeting, or have an end date, for example, a 5-week preparing meeting, held each Friday evening. An arrangement meeting resembles a repeating meeting, yet the points of interest vary from meeting to meeting. One case of an agreement meeting is a month to month “lunch and learn” occasion at an organization, church, club or association. Formal or casual deliberative gathering of people called to wrangle about specific issues, and to take choices. Formal gatherings held at distinct circumstances, at an unequivocal place, and for an unmistakable span to take after a settled upon plan. A director normally heads a meeting, and its thoughts get recorded in a composed frame called minutes.