Difference Wiki

Meet vs. Met: What's the Difference?

Edited by Sawaira Riaz || By Sumera Saeed || Updated on October 9, 2023
"Meet" is the present tense form of the verb, indicating a current action; "met" is the past tense, denoting a completed encounter.

Key Differences

"Meet" and "met" are both forms of the verb that refers to coming into contact or connection with someone or something. "Meet" is used in the present tense. When someone says they are going to "meet" a person, it suggests the action hasn't happened yet or is currently ongoing. On the other hand, "met" implies the action of meeting has already taken place in the past.
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023
In sentences, the word "meet" can be used to indicate future intentions or current activities. For example, "I will meet him at the park," or "I meet with her every week." Conversely, "met" would be used to describe past events. An example would be, "I met him at the park last week."
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023
Grammatically, "meet" is a base form, while "met" is the simple past and past participle form of the verb. Thus, "meet" might be paired with helping verbs to create future or present continuous tenses, like "will meet" or "am meeting." "Met," however, can be used to create perfect tenses, like "have met" or "had met."
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023
To provide further clarity, "meet" is an active process or an intention, indicating either an ongoing action or something planned for the future. "Met," however, always refers to a past event, ensuring the listener or reader understands the meeting has already taken place.
Aimie Carlson
Oct 09, 2023

Comparison Chart

Tense

Present
Past
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023
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Usage in Sentence

Describes current or future action
Describes past action
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Grammatical Form

Base form of the verb
Simple past & past participle
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Example

"I meet him every day."
"I met him yesterday."
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Associated Time

Now or Future
Past
Janet White
Oct 09, 2023

Meet and Met Definitions

Meet

To encounter or confront.
They will meet challenges along the way.
Sawaira Riaz
Oct 09, 2023
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Met

Past tense of coming into the presence of someone.
I met her two years ago.
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Meet

To join or connect.
The two roads meet here.
Janet White
Oct 09, 2023

Met

Previously encountered or confronted.
He met similar problems in the past.
Sawaira Riaz
Oct 09, 2023

Meet

To fulfill or satisfy.
This meets my expectations.
Sara Rehman
Oct 09, 2023

Met

Previously joined or connected.
The teams met in the finals last year.
Harlon Moss
Oct 09, 2023

Meet

To assemble for a purpose.
We meet every Friday for discussions.
Janet White
Oct 09, 2023

Met

Satisfied or fulfilled in the past.
The requirements were met.
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Meet

To come into the presence of.
I will meet him at the station.
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Met

Assembled in the past for some reason.
They met last summer for a conference.
Harlon Moss
Oct 09, 2023

Meet

To come into the presence of by chance or arrangement
I was surprised to meet an old friend in the park. I met a friend for coffee.
Sumera Saeed
Aug 14, 2017

Met

Past tense and past participle of meet1.
Sumera Saeed
Aug 14, 2017

Met

To dream; to occur (to one) in a dream.
Sumera Saeed
Aug 14, 2017

FAQs

How do I use "meet" in the present continuous tense?

You can use "meet" with "am," "is," or "are," as in "I am meeting her now."
Janet White
Oct 09, 2023

Can "meet" indicate future actions?

Yes, "meet" can describe future intentions, like "I will meet her tomorrow."
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Is "met" the past form of "meet"?

Yes, "met" is the past tense of "meet."
Sawaira Riaz
Oct 09, 2023

Can "meet" describe two objects coming together?

Yes, like "The two rivers meet downstream."
Sara Rehman
Oct 09, 2023

Can "meet" refer to joining paths or roads?

Yes, "meet" can mean to join or connect, like "The two paths meet at the river."
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Is "met" used in the present perfect tense?

Yes, you can use "met" in the present perfect, like "I have met her before."
Aimie Carlson
Oct 09, 2023

How can I use "meet" to indicate satisfaction?

You can say something like, "This solution meets our needs."
Janet White
Oct 09, 2023

Is "met" always about people?

No, "met" can refer to meeting challenges, requirements, or even where two things join.
Sara Rehman
Oct 09, 2023

Does "meet" have a noun form?

Yes, "meet" can also be a noun referring to a sports competition or gathering.
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

What tense is "meet" used in?

"Meet" is used in the present tense.
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Does "met" always refer to a past event?

Yes, "met" always denotes a past meeting or encounter.
Harlon Moss
Oct 09, 2023

What's the negative form of "meet" in the present?

The negative form in the present is "do not meet" or "does not meet."
Harlon Moss
Oct 09, 2023

In which situations can "met" be used?

"Met" can describe past encounters, confrontations, gatherings, or fulfillments.
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

Can "meet" be used in passive sentences?

Yes, for example, "He was met at the airport by his family."
Sara Rehman
Oct 09, 2023

What does "met" mean in the context of challenges?

"Met" can mean previously confronted or encountered, like "She met many challenges head-on."
Sara Rehman
Oct 09, 2023

How does "meet" relate to gatherings?

"Meet" can mean to assemble, like "They meet every week for a game."
Janet White
Oct 09, 2023

How do I use "met" in the past perfect tense?

You can say something like, "I had met him before the event."
Harlon Moss
Oct 09, 2023

How would I say I had an encounter with someone in the past using "met"?

You can say, "I met him last year."
Janet White
Oct 09, 2023

Can "met" indicate satisfaction in the past?

Yes, like "The conditions were met."
Sumera Saeed
Oct 09, 2023

What is the past participle form of "meet"?

The past participle form of "meet" is "met."
Harlon Moss
Oct 09, 2023
About Author
Written by
Sumera Saeed
Sumera is an experienced content writer and editor with a niche in comparative analysis. At Diffeence Wiki, she crafts clear and unbiased comparisons to guide readers in making informed decisions. With a dedication to thorough research and quality, Sumera's work stands out in the digital realm. Off the clock, she enjoys reading and exploring diverse cultures.
Edited by
Sawaira Riaz
Sawaira is a dedicated content editor at difference.wiki, where she meticulously refines articles to ensure clarity and accuracy. With a keen eye for detail, she upholds the site's commitment to delivering insightful and precise content.

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