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Assume vs. Presume

The main difference between assume and presume is in their meaning. Assume means to make a guess which is based on little or no evidence, whereas the verb presumes means to make a rational guess which is based on some evidence.

Key Differences

Assume derives from the Latin word sumere, which has the meaning “to take or to adopt while the word presumes also originates from the Latin verb sumere which has the meaning “to take upon, to take the liberty, to take for granted.
The degree of probability in the verb ‘assume’ is less; on the contrary, the degree of probability in the verb ‘presume’ is more.
Janet White
Apr 01, 2022
To assume means to make a guess which is based on little or no evidence on the flip side to presume means to make a rational guess which is based on some evidence.
The assumption is a loose guess with no evidence from the situation; on the other hand, the presumption is a strong or informed guess with evidence from the situation.
The assumption is irrational conversely presumption is somehow rational.
The meaning of assume is to suppose or to undertake whereas the meaning of presume is to dare, to suppose, or to take for granted.
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Comparison Chart

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A verb that means to suppose or to undertake. It also means to take for granted or to take upon
A verb that means to dare, to suppose, or to take for granted

Degree of Probability

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Origin

Latin word sumere which has the meaning “to take or to adopt”
Latin verb sumere which has the meaning “to take upon, to take the liberty, to take for granted

Examples

I assume that this is the natural color of your eyes
I presume you are exhausted after such a hectic routine
Samantha Walker
Apr 01, 2022

Prefix

-as
-pre

Assume and Presume Definitions

Assume

To take for granted; suppose
The study assumes that prices will rise.
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Presume

To take for granted as being true in the absence of proof to the contrary
"I presume you're tired after the long ride" (Edith Wharton).

Assume

To take upon oneself (a duty or obligation)
Assume responsibility.
Assume another's debts.

Presume

To constitute reasonable evidence for assuming; appear to prove
A signed hotel bill presumes occupancy of a room.

Assume

To undertake the duties of (an office)
Assumed the presidency.

Presume

To venture without authority or permission; dare
He presumed to invite himself to dinner.

Assume

To take on (an appearance, role, or form, for example); adopt
"The god assumes a human form" (John Ruskin).
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Presume

To take for granted that something is true or factual; make a supposition.

Assume

To pretend to have; feign
Assume an air of authority.

Presume

To act presumptuously or take unwarranted advantage of something
Don't presume on their hospitality.

Assume

To take over without justification; seize
Assume control.

Presume

(transitive) With infinitive object: to be so presumptuous as (to do something) without proper authority or permission.
I wouldn't presume to tell him how to do his job.

Assume

To clothe oneself in; don
The queen assumed a velvet robe.

Presume

To perform, do (something) without authority; to lay claim to without permission.
Don't make the decision yourself and presume too much.

Assume

To take up or receive into heaven.

Presume

(transitive) To assume or suggest to be true (without proof); to take for granted, to suppose.
Paw-prints in the snow allow us to presume a visit from next door's cat.
Dr. Livingstone, I presume?

Assume

To make a supposition; suppose or believe
"Is Kay's husband coming to dinner too?" "I assume so.".

Presume

(transitive) To take as a premise; to assume for the sake of argument.

Assume

To authenticate by means of belief; to surmise; to suppose to be true, especially without proof
We assume that, as her parents were dentists, she knows quite a bit about dentistry.

Presume

(intransitive) To be presumptuous; with on, upon, to take advantage (of), to take liberties (with).

Assume

To take on a position, duty or form
Mr. Jones will assume the position of a lifeguard until a proper replacement is found.

Presume

To assume or take beforehand; esp., to do or undertake without leave or authority previously obtained.
Dare he presume to scorn us in this manner?
Bold deed thou hast presumed, adventurous Eve.

Assume

To adopt a feigned quality or manner; to claim without right; to arrogate
He assumed an air of indifference

Presume

To take or suppose to be true, or entitled to belief, without examination or proof, or on the strength of probability; to take for granted; to infer; to suppose.
Every man is to be presumed innocent till he is proved to be guilty.
What rests but that the mortal sentence pass, . . . Which he presumes already vain and void,Because not yet inflicted?

Assume

To receive, adopt (a person)

Presume

To suppose or assume something to be, or to be true, on grounds deemed valid, though not amounting to proof; to believe by anticipation; to infer; as, we may presume too far.

Assume

To adopt (an idea or cause)

Presume

To venture, go, or act, by an assumption of leave or authority not granted; to go beyond what is warranted by the circumstances of the case; to venture beyond license; to take liberties; - often with on or upon before the ground of confidence.
Do not presume too much upon my love.
This man presumes upon his parts.

Assume

To take to or upon one's self; to take formally and demonstratively; sometimes, to appropriate or take unjustly.
Trembling they stand while Jove assumes the throne.
The god assumed his native form again.

Presume

Take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof;
I assume his train was late

Assume

To take for granted, or without proof; to suppose as a fact; to suppose or take arbitrarily or tentatively.
The consequences of assumed principles.

Presume

Take upon oneself; act presumptuously, without permission;
How dare you call my lawyer?

Assume

To pretend to possess; to take in appearance.
Ambition assuming the mask of religion.
Assume a virtue, if you have it not.

Presume

Constitute reasonable evidence for;
A restaurant bill presumes the consumption of food

Assume

To receive or adopt.
The sixth was a young knight of lesser renown and lower rank, assumed into that honorable company.

Presume

Take liberties or act with too much confidence

Assume

To be arrogant or pretentious; to claim more than is due.

Assume

To undertake, as by a promise.

Assume

Take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof;
I assume his train was late

Assume

Take on titles, offices, duties, responsibilities;
When will the new President assume office?

Assume

Take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect;
His voice took on a sad tone
The story took a new turn
He adopted an air of superiority
She assumed strange manners
The gods assume human or animal form in these fables

Assume

Take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person;
I'll accept the charges
She agreed to bear the responsibility

Assume

Occupy or take on;
He assumes the lotus position
She took her seat on the stage
We took our seats in the orchestra
She took up her position behind the tree
Strike a pose

Assume

Seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession;
He assumed to himself the right to fill all positions in the town
He usurped my rights
She seized control of the throne after her husband died

Assume

Make a pretence of;
She assumed indifference, even though she was seething with anger
He feigned sleep

Assume

Christianity, obsolete; take up someone's soul into heaven;
This is the day when May was assumed into heaven

Assume

Put clothing on one's body;
What should I wear today?
He put on his best suit for the wedding
The princess donned a long blue dress
The queen assumed the stately robes
He got into his jeans

Assume vs. Presume

Assume and presume are verbs. The meaning of assume is to suppose or to undertake. It also means to take for granted or to take upon. The meaning of presume is to dare, to suppose, or to take for granted. The difference between assume and presume is in the degree of their certainty. Assume means to make a guess which is based on little or no evidence. It is irrational. However, to presume means to make a rational guess, which is based on some evidence.

The assumption is a loose guess with no evidence from the situation. The presumption is a strong or informed guess with pieces of evidence from the situation. There is a difference in the degree of probability between both words. The degree of probability in the verb assume is less. The degree of probability in the verb presume is more.

The words ‘assume’ and ‘presume’ originates from the same root. Assume derives from the Latin word summer, which has the meaning “to take or to adopt.” The word presumes also originates from the Latin verb summer, which has the meaning “to take upon, to take the liberty, to take for granted. The words assume and presume are, sometimes, interchangeable. For example, I assume I can get my reputation back if I go to that event. I presume I can get my reputation back if I go to that event.

The difference between assume and presume can also be kept in mind by the “pre” in presume. Both the words are spelled the same, but their prefix is different. In general, both the words assume and presume have their existence, meaning, and usage.

What is Assume?

The meaning of assume is to suppose or to undertake something. It also means to take for granted or to take upon. Assume means to make a guess which is based on little or no proof/evidence. It is irrational. If someone says that he assumes a certain thing then t means that he has no idea if his assumption is true or false. It is something close to the intuitions or related to it. However, assumptions can also be true in many cases.

In the parts of speech, assume falls into the degree of the verb. It is a task that someone does. Assume is also used while someone is making a debate. For example, “Assuming you are correct, why should I do that? The assumption is a loose guess, with no evidence from the situation. It just depends on the will of a person and what he wants from a particular situation/condition. The degree of probability in the verb assume is less.

As far as its etymology is concerned, assume derives from the Latin word sumere, which has the meaning “to take or to adopt.” Sometimes, assume is also synonymous with its counterpart presume.

Examples

  • I assume that this is the natural color of your eyes.
  • I assume you have made these cheese sandwiches.
  • Clark assumed the dress she was going to wear on her birthday next year.

What is Presume?

The meaning of presume is to dare, to suppose, or to take for granted. In the parts of speech, presume falls into the category of a verb. To presume means to make a rational guess, which is based on some evidence. Presume needs proof or evidence. It always has proof as to its basis. Presume is also sometimes synonymous with its counterpart assume. The presumption is a strong or informed guess with pieces of evidence from the situation. The degree of probability in the verb presume is high.

The origin of presume dates back to the Latin verb sumere, which has the meaning “to take upon, to take the liberty, to take for granted. To presume also means “to act without permission, to undertake with boldness.” Presume has a different meaning in the context of the law. It refers to the acceptance of something as true because the proof of its falsity is not presented in court.

Examples

  • I presume you are exhausted after such a hectic routine.
  • I was going with my friends somewhere, and we saw a bus accident. It was so intense that we presumed many severe injuries.
  • “I can find my lost wallet if I go to the mall again,” he presumed.

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