Prologue vs. Epilogue

Main Difference

The main difference between prologue and epilogue is that prologue present at the beginning of the story, whereas epilogue is present at the end of the story.

Prologue vs. Epilogue — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Prologue and Epilogue

Prologue vs. Epilogue

The prologue is the introductory section, whereas; epilogue is the concluded part of the story.

Prologue vs. Epilogue

Prologue directed towards the main story; on the other hand, epilogue provides information about the fate of characters.

Prologue vs. Epilogue

The prologue gives background details conversely; epilogue covers the loose end, which was left unresolved in the story.

Prologue vs. Epilogue

Prologue creates curiosity on the flip side; epilogue satisfies the reader’s curiosity.

Prologue vs. Epilogue

Prologue hints about the given story whereas, epilogue hint the next installment of the story.

Prologue vs. Epilogue

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Prologuenoun

A speech or section used as an introduction, especially to a play or novel.

Epiloguenoun

A short speech, spoken directly at the audience at the end of a play

Prologuenoun

One who delivers a prologue.

Epiloguenoun

The performer who gives this speech

Prologuenoun

(computing) A component of a computer program that prepares the computer to execute a routine.

Epiloguenoun

A brief oration or script at the end of a literary piece; an afterword

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Prologuenoun

(cycling) An individual time trial before a stage race, used to determine which rider wears the leader's jersey on the first stage.

Epiloguenoun

(computing) A component of a computer program that prepares the computer to return from a routine.

Prologueverb

To introduce with a formal preface, or prologue.

Epilogueverb

(transitive) To conclude with an epilogue.

Prologuenoun

an introduction to a play

Epiloguenoun

a short speech (often in verse) addressed directly to the audience by an actor at the end of a play

Epiloguenoun

a short passage added at the end of a literary work;

the epilogue told what eventually happened to the main characters

Comparison Chart

PrologueEpilogue
The prologue is a separate introductory part of literary work at the start.An epilogue is a comparatively shorter section found at the end of literary work.
Function
Introduction to the storyConclusion of the story
Origin
1300-1400, Old French1400-1500, French
Characteristic
Arises curiositySpoken directly

Prologue vs. Epilogue

The prologue is a part of English literature which is found at the start of a novel or story. An epilogue is a part that comes at the end of the story or novel. The prologue introduces the story or drama that is explained afterward.

An epilogue concludes the story or drama that ends the above-explained story. The prologue establishes the setting and also.give information about the background. Epilogue gives details about the destiny of roles and characters of the story.

What is prologue?

The word ‘prologue’ originates from the word ‘logos’ means ‘speech,’ and the prefix pro- means ‘before.’ In short, it is the before- word. Naturally, it is comparatively shorter than the main section, or it may only be a single page or two in length.

Usually, it gives information about the events which come before the story. The prologue establishes the settings related to the main story. The prologue should have specific properties as it should explain the fictional world. It also shows the main events coming into the story.

It arises the curiosity in the reader’s mind so he may be able to have a bundle of questions arising in his mind. These remaining questions compel the reader to catch the main story. In short, prologue should develop an interest in the upcoming chapter. Prologue must be ‘storified.’

As it stays outside the main story, but it doesn’t mean that it should not be interesting. A prologue should not contain the main outline of the story that a reader may skip for the main narrative. If the main story is humor relevant, then prologue can be funny and humorous.

Example

  • From the book’ The Color of Magic’

‘In a distant and second- handset of dimensions, in an astral plane that was never meant to fly, the curling star- mists waver and part…’

  • In ‘Concerning Hobbits’

‘They seldom now reach three feet; but they have dwindled, they say, and in ancient days they were taller.’

What is Epilogue?

An epilogue is the opposite of Prologue. Epilogue derived from the word ‘Logos’ means speech, and the prefix Epi means ‘after.’ Hence it is the After- Word. It is present at the end of the main section and serves as a conclusion to the story.

Epilogue’s length varies depending upon the main narrative. It gives information related to the fates of characters that are introduced in the main story. It also helps out the main story, as it solves the issues that were not solved in the main story.

It can also give some points about the completion of the book. Sometimes, an author can use different scenarios in the epilogue. This may help to keep it separate from the main story. Epilogue describes the storyteller’s last consideration.

It also limits the possibilities of a sequel. Epilogue set a few hours after the main section of the story or leading to the future, where an author addresses the readers indirectly. An epilogue describes the reasons for writing a story or book.

Example

  • From Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet;

‘A glooming peace this morning with it brings

The sun for sorrow will not show his head,

Go hence to have more talk of these sad things,

Some shall be pardoned, and some punished,

For never was a story of more woe,

Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.’

Conclusion

Prologue and epilogue are the two main parts of literary work in English. They may have some similarities but also have huge differences in their usage and role in literature.