Except vs. Exempt

Except vs. Exempt — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Except and Exempt

Exceptverb

(transitive) To exclude; to specify as being an exception.

Exemptadjective

Free from a duty or obligation.

In their country all women are exempt from military service.His income is so small that it is exempt from tax.

Exceptverb

(intransitive) To take exception, to object (to or against).

to except to a witness or his testimony

Exemptadjective

(of an employee or his position) Not entitled to overtime pay when working overtime.

Exceptpreposition

With the exception of; but.

There was nothing in the cupboard except a tin of beans.

Exemptadjective

(obsolete) Cut off; set apart.

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Exceptconjunction

With the exception (that); used to introduce a clause, phrase or adverb forming an exception or qualification to something previously stated.

You look a bit like my sister, except she has longer hair.I never made fun of her except teasingly.

Exemptadjective

(obsolete) Extraordinary; exceptional.

Exceptconjunction

(archaic) Unless; used to introduce a hypothetical case in which an exception may exist.

Exemptnoun

One who has been released from something.

Exceptverb

take exception to;

he demurred at my suggestion to work on Saturday

Exemptnoun

(historical) A type of French police officer.

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Exceptverb

prevent from being included or considered or accepted;

The bad results were excluded from the reportLeave off the top piece

Exemptnoun

(UK) One of four officers of the Yeomen of the Royal Guard, having the rank of corporal; an exon.

Exemptverb

(transitive) To grant (someone) freedom or immunity from.

Citizens over 45 years of age were exempted from military service.

Exemptverb

grant relief or an exemption from a rule or requirement to;

She exempted me from the exam

Exemptverb

grant exemption or release to;

Please excuse me from this class

Exemptadjective

(of persons) freed from or not subject to an obligation or liability (as e.g. taxes) to which others or other things are subject;

a beauty somehow exempt from the aging processexempt from jury dutyonly the very poorest citizens should be exempt from income taxes

Exemptadjective

(of goods or funds) not subject to taxation;

the funds of nonprofit organizations are nontaxableincome exempt from taxation