Snag vs. Tooth

Snag vs. Tooth — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Snag and Tooth

Snagnoun

A stump or base of a branch that has been lopped off; a short branch, or a sharp or rough branch.

Toothnoun

A hard, calcareous structure present in the mouth of many vertebrate animals, generally used for eating.

Snagnoun

A dead tree that remains standing.

Toothnoun

A sharp projection on the blade of a saw or similar implement.

Snagnoun

A tree, or a branch of a tree, fixed in the bottom of a river or other navigable water, and rising nearly or quite to the surface, by which boats are sometimes pierced and sunk.

Toothnoun

A projection on the edge of a gear that meshes with similar projections on adjacent gears, or on the circumference of a cog that engages with a chain.

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Snagnoun

(by extension) Any sharp protuberant part of an object, which may catch, scratch, or tear other objects brought into contact with it.

Toothnoun

(zoology) A projection or point in other parts of the body resembling the tooth of a vertebrate animal.

Snagnoun

A tooth projecting beyond the others; a broken or decayed tooth.

Toothnoun

(botany) A pointed projection from the margin of a leaf.

Snagnoun

(figuratively) A problem or difficulty with something.

we hit a snag

Toothnoun

(animation) The rough surface of some kinds of cel or other films that allows better adhesion of artwork.

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Snagnoun

A pulled thread or yarn, as in cloth.

Toothnoun

(figurative) liking, fondness, appetite, taste, palate (compare toothsome)

I have a sweet tooth: I love sugary treats.

Snagnoun

One of the secondary branches of an antler.

Toothnoun

(algebraic geometry) An irreducible component of a comb that intersects the handle in exactly one point, that point being distinct from the unique point of intersection for any other tooth of the comb.

Snagnoun

A light meal.

Toothverb

To provide or furnish with teeth.

Snagnoun

A sausage.

Toothverb

To indent; to jag.

to tooth a saw

Snagnoun

A goal.

Toothverb

To lock into each other, like gear wheels.

Snagnoun

A misnaged, an opponent to Chassidic Judaism (more likely modern, for cultural reasons).

Toothnoun

hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense

Snagverb

To catch or tear (e.g. fabric) upon a rough surface or projection.

Be careful not to snag your stockings on that concrete bench!

Toothnoun

something resembling the tooth of an animal

Snagverb

To damage or sink (a vessel) by collision; said of a tree or branch fixed to the bottom of a navigable body of water and partially submerged or rising to just beneath the surface.

The steamboat was snagged on the Mississippi River in 1862.

Toothnoun

toothlike structure in invertebrates found in the mouth or alimentary canal or on a shell

Snagverb

(fishing) To fish by means of dragging a large hook or hooks on a line, intending to impale the body (rather than the mouth) of the target.

We snagged for spoonbill from the eastern shore of the Mississippi River.

Toothnoun

a means of enforcement;

the treaty had no teeth in it

Snagverb

To obtain or pick up.

Ella snagged a bottle of water from the fridge before leaving for her jog.

Toothnoun

one of a number of uniform projections on a gear

Snagverb

To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly.

Snagnoun

a sharp protuberance

Snagnoun

a dead tree that is still standing, usually in an undisturbed forest;

a snag can provide food and a habitat for insects and birds

Snagnoun

an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart;

there was a rip in his pantsshe had snags in her stockings

Snagnoun

an unforeseen obstacle

Snagverb

catch on a snag;

I snagged my stocking

Snagverb

get by acting quickly and smartly;

snag a bargain

Snagverb

hew jaggedly