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Scalar vs. Scaler: What's the Difference?

Scalar and Scaler Definitions

Scalar

A quantity, such as mass, length, or speed, that is completely specified by its magnitude and has no direction.

Scaler

An electronic circuit that records the aggregate of a specific number of signals that occur too rapidly to be recorded individually.

Scalar

(Mathematics) A number, numerical quantity, or element in a field.

Scaler

An electronic circuit that aggregates many signals into one.

Scalar

A device that yields an output equal to the input multiplied by a constant, as in a linear amplifier.
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Scaler

An electronic or computer system that adjusts the size of a signal or graphic to fit on a screen etc.

Scalar

Of or relating to a scalar.

Scaler

One who scales.

Scalar

(mathematics) Having magnitude but not direction.

Scaler

A tool or device for scaling fish.
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Scalar

(computer science) Consisting of a single value (e.g. integer or string) rather than multiple values (e.g. array).

Scaler

One who, or that which, scales; specifically, a dentist's instrument for removing tartar from the teeth.

Scalar

Of, or relating to scale.

Scaler

An electronic pulse counter used to count pulses that occur too rapidly to be recorded individually

Scalar

(music) Of or pertaining to a musical scale.
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Scalar

(physics) Relating to particles with a spin quantum angular momentum of 0 (known as spin 0).

Scalar

(linguistics) Pertaining to the dimension on which something is measured.

Scalar

(mathematics) A quantity that has magnitude but not direction; compare vector.

Scalar

(electronics) An amplifier whose output is a constant multiple of its input.

Scalar

In the quaternion analysis, a quantity that has magnitude, but not direction; - distinguished from a vector, which has both magnitude and direction.

Scalar

A variable quantity that cannot be resolved into components

Scalar

Of or relating to a directionless magnitude;
Scalar implicatures

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