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Pit vs. Pitted: What's the Difference?

Pit and Pitted Definitions

Pit

A natural or artificial hole or cavity in the ground.

Pitted

Marked by pits.

Pit

An excavation for the removal of mineral deposits; a mine.

Pitted

Having the pit removed
Pitted dates.

Pit

The shaft of a mine.
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Pitted

Simple past tense and past participle of pit

Pit

A concealed hole in the ground used as a trap; a pitfall.

Pitted

Having a surface marked by pits; pockmarked or alveolate

Pit

A small indentation in a surface
Pits in a windshield.

Pitted

(of fruit) Having had the pits removed
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Pit

A natural hollow or depression in the body or an organ.

Pitted

Provided with one or more inspection pits.

Pit

A small indented scar left in the skin by smallpox or other eruptive disease; a pockmark.

Pitted

Having minute thin spots; as, pitted ducts in the vascular parts of vegetable tissue.

Pit

(Zoology) Either of a pair of depressions between the nostril and the eye of a pit viper that contain heat-sensing organs.
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Pitted

Pitted with cell-like cavities (as a honeycomb)

Pit

(Botany) A cavity in the wall of a plant cell where there is no secondary wall, as in fibers, tracheids, and vessel elements.

Pit

(Informal) An armpit.

Pit

An enclosed, usually sunken area in which animals, such as dogs or gamecocks, are placed for fighting.

Pit

The section directly in front of and below the stage of a theater, in which the musicians sit.

Pit

Chiefly British The ground floor of a theater behind the stalls.

Pit

The section of an exchange where trading in a specific commodity is carried on.

Pit

The gambling area of a casino.

Pit

A sunken area in a garage floor from which mechanics may work on cars.

Pit

Often pits(Sports) An area beside an auto racecourse where cars may be refueled or serviced during a race
Pulled into the pits to have the tires rotated.

Pit

Hell. Used with the.

Pit

A miserable or depressing place or situation.

Pit

Pits(Slang) The worst. Used with the
"New York politics are the pits" (Washington Star).

Pit

(Football) The middle areas of the defensive and offensive lines.

Pit

The single central kernel or stone of certain fruits, such as a peach or cherry.

Pit

To mark with cavities, depressions, or scars
A surface pitted with craters.

Pit

To set in direct opposition or competition
A war that pitted brother against brother.

Pit

To place, bury, or store in a pit.

Pit

To become marked with pits.

Pit

To retain an impression after being indented. Used of the skin.

Pit

To stop at a refueling area during an auto race.

Pit

To extract the pit from (a fruit).

Pit

A hole in the ground.
The meadow around the town is full of old pits.

Pit

(motor racing) An area at a racetrack used for refueling and repairing the vehicles during a race.
Two drivers have already gone into the pit this early in the race.

Pit

(music) A section of the marching band containing mallet percussion instruments and other large percussion instruments too large to march, such as the tam tam. Also, the area on the sidelines where these instruments are placed.

Pit

A mine.

Pit

(archaeology) A hole or trench in the ground, excavated according to grid coordinates, so that the provenance of any feature observed and any specimen or artifact revealed may be established by precise measurement.

Pit

(trading) A trading pit.

Pit

The bottom part of something.
I felt pain in the pit of my stomach.

Pit

(colloquial) Armpit.

Pit

(aviation) A luggage hold.

Pit

(countable) A small surface hole or depression, a fossa.

Pit

The indented mark left by a pustule, as in smallpox.

Pit

The grave, underworld or Hell.

Pit

An enclosed area into which gamecocks, dogs, and other animals are brought to fight, or where dogs are trained to kill rats.

Pit

Formerly, that part of a theatre, on the floor of the house, below the level of the stage and behind the orchestra; now, in England, commonly the part behind the stalls; in the United States, the parquet; also, the occupants of such a part of a theatre.

Pit

(gambling) Part of a casino which typically holds tables for blackjack, craps, roulette, and other games.

Pit

(slang) A mosh pit.
Because the museum was closed for renovation, the school decided to bring its fourth-graders to the pit at a Cannibal Corpse gig instead.

Pit

(American football) The center of the line.

Pit

(hospital slang) The emergency department.

Pit

A bed.

Pit

(informal) An undesirable location, especially an unclean one.
This house is a total pit. We've got to get out of here!
Get back to the pit, dish bitch!

Pit

A seed inside a fruit; a stone or pip inside a fruit.

Pit

A shell in a drupe containing a seed.

Pit

(military) The core of an implosion nuclear weapon, consisting of the fissile material and any neutron reflector or tamper bonded to it.

Pit

(informal) A pit bull terrier.

Pit

(transitive) To make pits in; to mark with little hollows.
Exposure to acid rain pitted the metal.

Pit

(transitive) To put (an animal) into a pit for fighting.

Pit

(transitive) To bring (something) into opposition with something else.
Are you ready to pit your wits against one of the world's greatest puzzles?

Pit

To return to the pits during a race for refuelling, tyre changes, repairs etc.

Pit

(transitive) To remove the stone from a stone fruit or the shell from a drupe.
One must pit a peach to make it ready for a pie.

Pit

A large cavity or hole in the ground, either natural or artificial; a cavity in the surface of a body; an indentation
Tumble me into some loathsome pit.

Pit

Any abyss; especially, the grave, or hades.
Back to the infernal pit I drag thee chained.
He keepth back his soul from the pit.

Pit

A covered deep hole for entrapping wild beasts; a pitfall; hence, a trap; a snare. Also used figuratively.
The anointed of the Lord was taken in their pits.

Pit

A depression or hollow in the surface of the human body

Pit

Formerly, that part of a theater, on the floor of the house, below the level of the stage and behind the orchestra; now, in England, commonly the part behind the stalls; in the United States, the parquet; also, the occupants of such a part of a theater.

Pit

An inclosed area into which gamecocks, dogs, and other animals are brought to fight, or where dogs are trained to kill rats.

Pit

The endocarp of a drupe, and its contained seed or seeds; a stone; as, a peach pit; a cherry pit, etc.

Pit

To place or put into a pit or hole.
They lived like beasts, and were pitted like beasts, tumbled into the grave.

Pit

To mark with little hollows, as by various pustules; as, a face pitted by smallpox.

Pit

To introduce as an antagonist; to set forward for or in a contest; as, to pit one dog against another.

Pit

A sizeable hole (usually in the ground);
They dug a pit to bury the body

Pit

A concavity in a surface (especially an anatomical depression)

Pit

The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed;
You should remove the stones from prunes before cooking

Pit

A trap in the form of a concealed hole

Pit

A surface excavation for extracting stone or slate;
A British term for `quarry' is `stone pit'

Pit

Lowered area in front of a stage where an orchestra accompanies the performers

Pit

A workplace consisting of a coal mine plus all the buildings and equipment connected with it

Pit

Set into opposition or rivalry;
Let them match their best athletes against ours
Pit a chess player against the Russian champion
He plays his two children off against each other

Pit

Mark with a scar;
The skin disease scarred his face permanently

Pit

Remove the pits from;
Pit plums and cherries

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