Extract vs. Infuse

Extract vs. Infuse — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Extract and Infuse

Extractnoun

Something that is extracted or drawn out.

Infuseverb

(transitive) To cause to become an element of something; to insert or fill.

Extractnoun

A portion of a book or document, incorporated distinctly in another work; a citation; a quotation.

I used an extract of Hemingway's book to demonstrate culture shock.

Infuseverb

(transitive) To steep in a liquid, so as to extract the soluble constituents (usually medicinal or herbal).

Extractnoun

A decoction, solution, or infusion made by drawing out from any substance that which gives it its essential and characteristic virtue

extract of beefextract of dandelion

Infuseverb

(transitive) To inspire; to inspirit or animate; to fill (with).

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Extractnoun

Any substance extracted is such a way, and characteristic of that from which it is obtained

quinine is the most important extract of Peruvian bark.

Infuseverb

(transitive) To instill as a quality.

Extractnoun

A solid preparation obtained by evaporating a solution of a drug, etc., or the fresh juice of a plant (distinguished from an abstract).

Infuseverb

(intransitive) To undergo infusion.

Extractnoun

(obsolete) A peculiar principle (fundamental essence) once erroneously supposed to form the basis of all vegetable extracts.

Infuseverb

(transitive) To make an infusion with (an ingredient); to tincture; to saturate.

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Extractnoun

Ancestry; descent.

Infuseverb

To pour in, as a liquid; to pour (into or upon); to shed.

Extractnoun

A draft or copy of writing; a certified copy of the proceedings in an action and the judgment therein, with an order for execution.

Infuseverb

teach and impress by frequent repetitions or admonitions;

inculcate values into the young generation

Extractverb

(transitive) To draw out; to pull out; to remove forcibly from a fixed position, as by traction or suction, etc.

to extract a tooth from its socket, a stump from the earth, or a splinter from the finger

Infuseverb

fill, as with a certain quality;

The heavy traffic tinctures the air with carbon monoxide

Extractverb

(transitive) To withdraw by expression, distillation, or other mechanical or chemical process. Compare abstract (transitive verb).

to extract an essential oil from a plant

Infuseverb

undergo the process of infusion;

the mint tea is infusing

Extractverb

(transitive) To take by selection; to choose out; to cite or quote, as a passage from a book.

Infuseverb

let sit in a liquid to extract a flavor or to cleanse;

steep the blossoms in oilsteep the fruit in alcohol

Extractverb

(transitive) To select parts of a whole

We need to try to extract the positives from the defeat.

Infuseverb

introduce into the body through a vein, for therapeutic purposes;

Some physiologists infuses sugar solutions into the veins of animals

Extractverb

To determine (a root of a number).

Please extract the cube root of 27.

Extractnoun

a solution obtained by steeping or soaking a substance (usually in water)

Extractnoun

a passage selected from a larger work;

he presented excerpts from William James' philosophical writings

Extractverb

draw or pull out, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense;

pull weedsextract a bad toothtake out a splinterextract information from the telegram

Extractverb

get despite difficulties or obstacles;

I extracted a promise from the Dean for two ne positions

Extractverb

deduce (a principle) or construe (a meaning);

We drew out some interesting linguistic data from the native informant

Extractverb

extract by the process of distillation;

distill the essence of this compound

Extractverb

separate (a metal) from an ore

Extractverb

obtain from a substance, as by mechanical action;

Italians express coffee rather than filter it

Extractverb

take out of a literary work in order to cite or copy

Extractverb

calculate the root of a number